Topics

OS Choice Question

Mike Bott
 

Looking for a bit of guidance. The pc that I currently use to support my SDR activities is an i5-4570K CPU with 16GB ram running Windows 10 Pro. The video is a GeForce GTX 1050. This pc is primarily used for SDR support. My preferred OS is Linux and I've been primarily a Linux user for the past 12 years. I recently rescued an older laptop for DXpedition/portable use which is running Windows 8.1 Pro. Long story short, I prefer 8.1 over 10. I do have another Window 8.0 Pro dvd that I could load on my SDR pc, after replacing the Win10 HD.

The current SDR software is Console (both v2.3 and v3.0), SDRuno, SDR# and HDSDR along with Win 4IcomSuite.

Of course, I'd keep the Win10HD but is anyone here aware of any potential issues with running 8.1. I can say that with the older AMD A6 laptop, 8.1 seems to be up to the task ... so far.

What do you think?

--
Mike

N4BUT
 

I am also a Linux user primarily, but using Win10 just for SDR-Radio from Simon because its the best. BUT with regards to the Win8 question, it was end of life and no longer receiving updates as of January 2018 and it would be important to keep it up to date.. for security..

Joe Puma
 

With regarding to win8 and security updates. Let’s be honest, what threats is your PC exposed to if you’re behind your router and you just use your PC for radio and you carefully browse sites you know are safe. 

Joe
Kd2nfc 


On Jul 8, 2019, at 9:48 AM, tyrnight@... wrote:

I am also a Linux user primarily, but using Win10 just for SDR-Radio from Simon because its the best. BUT with regards to the Win8 question, it was end of life and no longer receiving updates as of January 2018 and it would be important to keep it up to date.. for security..

Mike Bott
 

On 7/8/19 9:48 AM, tyrnight@... wrote:
I am also a Linux user primarily, but using Win10 just for SDR-Radio from Simon because its the best. BUT with regards to the Win8 question, it was end of life and no longer receiving updates as of January 2018 and it would be important to keep it up to date.. for security..
_._,_._,_
You might want to review the Microsoft End Of Life documentation as it states the Extended Support runs to 10 Jan 2023.

--
Mike

David J Taylor
 

From: Mike Bott
[]
Long story short, I prefer 8.1 over 10.
[]
What do you think?

Mike
==============================

Mike,

I think it would be worth considering Windows-10, and perhaps discussing why you prefer the older OS. Whether this is the best place, I don't know? You will likely get much better support on Win-10. You might also consider whether a 64-bit or 32-bit OS is better for your needs.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv

Simon Brown
 

I agree,

Always go for Windows 10. Bite the bullet, maybe a little to learn, but it's an excellent OS in my opinion.

Simon Brown, G4ELI
https://www.sdr-radio.com

-----Original Message-----
From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of David J Taylor via Groups.Io
Sent: 08 July 2019 19:38
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] OS Choice Question

From: Mike Bott
[]
Long story short, I prefer 8.1 over 10.
[]
What do you think?

Mike
==============================

Mike,

I think it would be worth considering Windows-10, and perhaps discussing why you prefer the older OS. Whether this is the best place, I don't know? You will likely get much better support on Win-10. You might also consider whether a 64-bit or 32-bit OS is better for your needs.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv

Dick
 

On Mon, Jul 8, 2019 at 03:59 PM, Joe Puma wrote:


sites you know are safe
These "known to be safe" sites suddenly and without prior warning can become unsafe.
Also a lot depends on your router (seetings), but I would not underestimate what hackers can accomplish.
My VNC server log shows login attempts at least once a week.

73, Dick

jdow
 

I rather prefer 10, a VERY thoroughly tweaked 10. WinAero Tweater and 7+ Taskbar Tweaker to the rescue of a damn near unusable Windows 10 on a desktop. (I also deleted all the cruft from the "Metro" extension to the start button. The only thing that still bugs me is the fact I cannot sort the start menu MY way rather than the approved one and only salute the PC police or die Microsoft way.)

{^_^}

On 20190708 11:37:48, David J Taylor via Groups.Io wrote:
From: Mike Bott
[]
Long story short, I prefer 8.1 over 10.
[]
What do you think?
Mike
==============================
Mike,
I think it would be worth considering Windows-10, and perhaps discussing why you prefer the older OS.  Whether this is the best place, I don't know?  You will likely get much better support on Win-10.  You might also consider whether a 64-bit or 32-bit OS is better for your needs.
Cheers,
David

jdow
 

On 20190708 11:57:42, Dick wrote:
On Mon, Jul 8, 2019 at 03:59 PM, Joe Puma wrote:


sites you know are safe
These "known to be safe" sites suddenly and without prior warning can become unsafe.
Also a lot depends on your router (seetings), but I would not underestimate what hackers can accomplish.
My VNC server log shows login attempts at least once a week.
73, Dick
Lemme see, I get thousands of attempts to crack through my firewall each day, perhaps 100 to 200 of them or so are attempts at telnet or ssh. I simply amend the firewall to block their whois disclosed address range. Huge swaths of Russia and even more of China are blocked. Brazil is another problem child. On the other end Oz, New Zealand, and Japan almost never appear. And when they do it looks more like a mistake than anything else. Ditto the US except for a select few ISPs I've had to block.

They are out there. They are trying to get you. But, it's nothing personal. They are simply looking for low hanging fruit. And a surprising number of routers have, themselves, been hacked. I am quite confident my Linux machine made into a router has NOT been hacked. It remains rigidly up to date and has a firewall with some crazy effective techniques in it even though I keep three ports open at all times. (You only get one SYN packet, connection attempt, every minute. Even guessing 9876543210 would take close to the age of the universe to get around to testing as a password. Crack attempts run to 10,000 tries per minute here. {^_-})

{^_^}

John Aldridge
 

On 08-Jul-19 19:57, Dick wrote:
On Mon, Jul 8, 2019 at 03:59 PM, Joe Puma wrote:


sites you know are safe
These "known to be safe" sites suddenly and without prior warning can become unsafe.
For example, there have been cases where the system for including advertisements in otherwise well intentioned sites has been compromised, and they started serving malware laden advertising.

--
John

Mike Bott
 

On 7/8/19 2:47 PM, Simon Brown wrote:
I agree,

Always go for Windows 10. Bite the bullet, maybe a little to learn, but it's an excellent OS in my opinion.

Simon Brown, G4ELI
https://www.sdr-radio.com

Simon, et al,

"The pc that I currently use to support my SDR activities is an i5-4570K CPU with 16GB ram running Windows 10 Pro."  I've been running Win10 since this pc updated from win8.1.  My 2012 HP pavilion g6 remained on 8.1 pro because it is just unable to run win10.  In using the HP pavilion, I find win8.1 takes up almost half the disk real estate than Win10 in completing the same function. They both exist to support my SDRs.

I've decided on pulling the win10 HD and installing win8 on a spare drive and evaluate it that way.  I appreciate the input.

--
Mike

N4BUT
 

Don't forget that you can use a Windows 7 or 8 license key to legally upgrade for free, If you install from scratch.

Simon Brown
 

Mike,

 

Hyper-V ?

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

-----Original Message-----
From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Bott
Sent: 08 July 2019 23:45
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] OS Choice Question

 

On 7/8/19 2:47 PM, Simon Brown wrote:

> I agree,

> Always go for Windows 10. Bite the bullet, maybe a little to learn, but it's an excellent OS in my opinion.

> Simon Brown, G4ELI

> https://www.sdr-radio.com

Simon, et al,

 

"The pc that I currently use to support my SDR activities is an i5-4570K CPU with 16GB ram running Windows 10 Pro."  I've been running Win10 since this pc updated from win8.1.  My 2012 HP pavilion g6 remained on

8.1 pro because it is just unable to run win10.  In using the HP pavilion, I find win8.1 takes up almost half the disk real estate than

Win10 in completing the same function. They both exist to support my SDRs.

 

I've decided on pulling the win10 HD and installing win8 on a spare drive and evaluate it that way.  I appreciate the input.

 

--

Mike

 

 

Bill Walch
 

Simon,

I know you're busy with SDRC and your many users, and I really do appreciate you're hard work for such a great platform. Being that you're a Win 10 proponent, I'd like your views (and probably you're users) on the challenges for using external hardware under Win 10, specifically related to radio. I have Win 10-64 installed on my laptop, but it's used for non-radio, low impact use. My desktop running Win7-64, and I've been very reluctant to upgrade. Further, some videos have cropped up that seem to have some valid points as to the direction that Win 10 (and Microsoft) is taking. Please look at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSykL1I-WIc on this very subject. As a developer, I'm sure you are (or want to be) keenly aware of these issues.

I know the security end of life is near for Win 7, but with programs like Norton in place, I'm fairly confident of keeping my PC safe from bad external forces. Besides, the bad guys are focusing on Win 10 anyway.

For me (as a former test and automation engineer), I've found that Win 7 to be a very solid and stable platform, especially when it comes to external hardware drivers for digital I/O, data acquisition hardware, etc. Even the question of 32-bit versus 64-bit OS's, for me, came down to hardware drivers. In the automation industry, it's been a very slow (if at all) to update legacy drivers and moving to USB 3.x (still living in the GPIB and RS-232 world). I assume though that in the radio field, specifically hardware related to SDR, the vendors are more up to date on their driver implementations. Seeing all the back and forth to things like USB relays, it tends to suggest that, at least for the radio world, it's still has a way to go.

Thanks, Bill

P.S. You noted Hyper-V below. I have not used this, but I have used VMware in the past, and found that in some cases, you loose direct hardware communication in that environment, even to the point of limited to no direct access to the PC's hard drive or other hardware.

On 7/9/2019 1:53 AM, Simon Brown wrote:

Mike,

 

Hyper-V ?

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

-----Original Message-----
From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Bott
Sent: 08 July 2019 23:45
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] OS Choice Question

 

On 7/8/19 2:47 PM, Simon Brown wrote:

> I agree,

> Always go for Windows 10. Bite the bullet, maybe a little to learn, but it's an excellent OS in my opinion.

> Simon Brown, G4ELI

> https://www.sdr-radio.com

Simon, et al,

 

"The pc that I currently use to support my SDR activities is an i5-4570K CPU with 16GB ram running Windows 10 Pro."  I've been running Win10 since this pc updated from win8.1.  My 2012 HP pavilion g6 remained on

8.1 pro because it is just unable to run win10.  In using the HP pavilion, I find win8.1 takes up almost half the disk real estate than

Win10 in completing the same function. They both exist to support my SDRs.

 

I've decided on pulling the win10 HD and installing win8 on a spare drive and evaluate it that way.  I appreciate the input.

 

--

Mike

 

 


jdow
 

If you are looking for out of the box without user customization Win 7 is vastly better than Win 10. My desktop is not a cellphone, thank you. BUT, if you dig up "WinAero Tweaker" and "7" Taskbar Tweaker", spend some time understanding what they are doing, and then make the right settings modifications Win 10 is VERY close to Win 7. I'd not consider Win 10 x32 for a picosecond. I'd not consider Win 10 Home, either. Win 10 Pro x64 is what you want. It can be tamed to actual usability. Two annoyances still exist. The first is the (apparent) forced alphabetization of the start menu. (I recently saw something that suggested to me this can be partially mitigated.) The second is forced upgrades as full sets with no partial updates. However you can delay many of the upgrades fairly easily. That gives you a chance to observe complaints that turn up with upgrades and updates so you can deal with it, at least partially. (It IS possible to stop updates entirely. Restarting them is a PITA so you'll have to figure it out for yourself. We use it for non-networked embedded systems to keep them sane.)

I guess there is a third issue. There is a LOT of cruftware in Win 10. And too much of it cannot be removed. I farking do NOT have nor do I plan to ever have a frigging XBOX, for example. Nor do I EVER plan to feed Cortana crumbs let alone a full meal. So I disable them. But I cannot save disk by removing them.

Once tamed as I have it, in many ways Win 10 is a significant improvement over Win 7. It is stable as a rock unless you have a flaky driver. (ATEN multi-port USB boxes have such. One I removed those drivers it works perfectly.) Win 10 handles multiple monitors with somewhat more grace and poise than Win 7, which is important here.

{^_^}

On 20190709 11:11:48, Willy Walch wrote:
Simon,
I know you're busy with SDRC and your many users, and I really do appreciate you're hard work for such a great platform. Being that you're a Win 10 proponent, I'd like your views (and probably you're users) on the challenges for using external hardware under Win 10, specifically related to radio. I have Win 10-64 installed on my laptop, but it's used for non-radio, low impact use. My desktop running Win7-64, and I've been very reluctant to upgrade. Further, some videos have cropped up that seem to have some valid points as to the direction that Win 10 (and Microsoft) is taking. Please look at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSykL1I-WIc on this very subject. As a developer, I'm sure you are (or want to be) keenly aware of these issues.
I know the security end of life is near for Win 7, but with programs like Norton in place, I'm fairly confident of keeping my PC safe from bad external forces. Besides, the bad guys are focusing on Win 10 anyway.
For me (as a former test and automation engineer), I've found that Win 7 to be a very solid and stable platform, especially when it comes to external hardware drivers for digital I/O, data acquisition hardware, etc. Even the question of 32-bit versus 64-bit OS's, for me, came down to hardware drivers. In the automation industry, it's been a very slow (if at all) to update legacy drivers and moving to USB 3.x (still living in the GPIB and RS-232 world). I assume though that in the radio field, specifically hardware related to SDR, the vendors are more up to date on their driver implementations. Seeing all the back and forth to things like USB relays, it tends to suggest that, at least for the radio world, it's still has a way to go.
Thanks, Bill
P.S. You noted Hyper-V below. I have not used this, but I have used VMware in the past, and found that in some cases, you loose direct hardware communication in that environment, even to the point of limited to no direct access to the PC's hard drive or other hardware.
On 7/9/2019 1:53 AM, Simon Brown wrote:

Mike,

Hyper-V <https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/virtualization/hyper-v-on-windows/quick-start/enable-hyper-v> ?

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

-----Original Message-----
From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Bott
Sent: 08 July 2019 23:45
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] OS Choice Question

On 7/8/19 2:47 PM, Simon Brown wrote:

I agree,
Always go for Windows 10. Bite the bullet, maybe a little to learn, but it's
an excellent OS in my opinion.

Simon Brown, G4ELI
https://www.sdr-radio.com
Simon, et al,

"The pc that I currently use to support my SDR activities is an i5-4570K CPU with 16GB ram running Windows 10 Pro."  I've been running Win10 since this pc updated from win8.1.  My 2012 HP pavilion g6 remained on

8.1 pro because it is just unable to run win10.  In using the HP pavilion, I find win8.1 takes up almost half the disk real estate than

Win10 in completing the same function. They both exist to support my SDRs.

I've decided on pulling the win10 HD and installing win8 on a spare drive and evaluate it that way.  I appreciate the input.

--

Mike

jdow
 

Incidentally, if Windows takes 10 where I cannot tolerate I won't be going back to 7. I'll be going to Linux as dreadful as it may be.

{o.o}

On 20190709 11:11:48, Willy Walch wrote:
Simon,
I know you're busy with SDRC and your many users, and I really do appreciate you're hard work for such a great platform. Being that you're a Win 10 proponent, I'd like your views (and probably you're users) on the challenges for using external hardware under Win 10, specifically related to radio. I have Win 10-64 installed on my laptop, but it's used for non-radio, low impact use. My desktop running Win7-64, and I've been very reluctant to upgrade. Further, some videos have cropped up that seem to have some valid points as to the direction that Win 10 (and Microsoft) is taking. Please look at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSykL1I-WIc on this very subject. As a developer, I'm sure you are (or want to be) keenly aware of these issues.
I know the security end of life is near for Win 7, but with programs like Norton in place, I'm fairly confident of keeping my PC safe from bad external forces. Besides, the bad guys are focusing on Win 10 anyway.
For me (as a former test and automation engineer), I've found that Win 7 to be a very solid and stable platform, especially when it comes to external hardware drivers for digital I/O, data acquisition hardware, etc. Even the question of 32-bit versus 64-bit OS's, for me, came down to hardware drivers. In the automation industry, it's been a very slow (if at all) to update legacy drivers and moving to USB 3.x (still living in the GPIB and RS-232 world). I assume though that in the radio field, specifically hardware related to SDR, the vendors are more up to date on their driver implementations. Seeing all the back and forth to things like USB relays, it tends to suggest that, at least for the radio world, it's still has a way to go.
Thanks, Bill
P.S. You noted Hyper-V below. I have not used this, but I have used VMware in the past, and found that in some cases, you loose direct hardware communication in that environment, even to the point of limited to no direct access to the PC's hard drive or other hardware.
On 7/9/2019 1:53 AM, Simon Brown wrote:

Mike,

Hyper-V <https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/virtualization/hyper-v-on-windows/quick-start/enable-hyper-v> ?

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

-----Original Message-----
From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Bott
Sent: 08 July 2019 23:45
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] OS Choice Question

On 7/8/19 2:47 PM, Simon Brown wrote:

I agree,
Always go for Windows 10. Bite the bullet, maybe a little to learn, but it's
an excellent OS in my opinion.

Simon Brown, G4ELI
https://www.sdr-radio.com
Simon, et al,

"The pc that I currently use to support my SDR activities is an i5-4570K CPU with 16GB ram running Windows 10 Pro."  I've been running Win10 since this pc updated from win8.1.  My 2012 HP pavilion g6 remained on

8.1 pro because it is just unable to run win10.  In using the HP pavilion, I find win8.1 takes up almost half the disk real estate than

Win10 in completing the same function. They both exist to support my SDRs.

I've decided on pulling the win10 HD and installing win8 on a spare drive and evaluate it that way.  I appreciate the input.

--

Mike

doug
 

On 07/09/2019 06:45 PM, jdow wrote:
Incidentally, if Windows takes 10 where I cannot tolerate I won't be
going back to 7. I'll be going to Linux as dreadful as it may be.

{o.o}
Hi, Joanne--

I have been using Linux just about exclusively for at least the last ten years. It is not, in my estimation, dreadful. It has the advantage that things are not hidden under infinite layers of goto boxes in the GUI. You can find and get almost any kind of software that you might want, for either rpm or deb systems, altho I prefer rpm. I used PCLinuxOS up until a recent "upgrade" crashed my system, and I discovered that the latest available version--and all the available software for it--has been effectively castrated! Many of the apps that I used on a regular basis are no longer available, and many of these are no longer installable even if you get them from rpmfind, as the
libs are not installable. I have no idea why this was instituted, but
I am now getting to know OpenSUSE Tumbleweed. I admit to having a problem installing a working Epson printer, even tho its PPD file is
in the distro already. (Printer is found, ink levels shown, but printing is unavailable, as is scanning from the same device.) An HP LaserJet came right up. Everything else that I need or want is installed and working. The software interface--YAST--is strange to me,
but seems to be useable, and the standard Linux installation tool--
apt-get install--works fine. You can even run Windows in a "window"
I guess you'd call it, but I would never even try that; I'd think it
would be asking for trouble! One thing that seems to be missing in
the latest Windows release--I don't think there is any way to turn off
fast boot, which means you can no longer access your Windows directories
from Linux. (Fast boot means there are always Windows files open, even when the machine is shut down.)

--doug, WA2SAY

PS: If there is some specific software that you need, I'll see if I know of a Linux version that I have used and works. There is, for instance, a drafting program that mimics Autocad, and there is a
good text reader for scanned-in documents. I have, however, bought
an office suite for word processing and spread-sheet reading/creating.
That's the ONLY thing I bought for Linux.

jdow
 

I've been using Linux since the 90s - RedHat Hurricane I think it was.

It ain't ready for prime time is my opinion. It's a pain in the patootie to use for some things. Audio is particularly "iffy".

{o.o}

On 20190709 17:17:19, doug wrote:
On 07/09/2019 06:45 PM, jdow wrote:
Incidentally, if Windows takes 10 where I cannot tolerate I won't be
going back to 7. I'll be going to Linux as dreadful as it may be.

{o.o}
Hi, Joanne--
I have been using Linux just about exclusively for at least the last ten years. It is not, in my estimation, dreadful. It has the advantage that things are not hidden under infinite layers of goto boxes in the GUI. You can find and get almost any kind of software that you might want, for either rpm or deb systems, altho I prefer rpm. I used PCLinuxOS up until a recent "upgrade" crashed my system, and I discovered that the latest available version--and all the available software for it--has been effectively castrated! Many of the apps that I used on a regular basis are no longer available, and many of these are no longer installable even if you get them from rpmfind, as the
libs are not installable. I have no idea why this was instituted, but
I am now getting to know OpenSUSE Tumbleweed. I admit to having a problem installing a working Epson printer, even tho its PPD file is
in the distro already. (Printer is found, ink levels shown, but printing is unavailable, as is scanning from the same device.) An HP LaserJet came right up. Everything else that I need or want is installed and working. The software interface--YAST--is strange to me,
but seems to be useable, and the standard Linux installation tool--
apt-get install--works fine. You can even run Windows in a "window"
I guess you'd call it, but I would never even try that; I'd think it
would be asking for trouble! One thing that seems to be missing in
the latest Windows release--I don't think there is any way to turn off
fast boot, which means you can no longer access your Windows directories
from Linux. (Fast boot means there are always Windows files open, even when the machine is shut down.)
--doug, WA2SAY
PS: If there is some specific software that you need, I'll see if I know of a Linux version that I have used and works. There is, for instance, a drafting program that mimics Autocad, and there is a
good text reader for scanned-in documents. I have, however, bought
an office suite for word processing and spread-sheet reading/creating.
That's the ONLY thing I bought for Linux.

vincent
 

I'm with you !!!
Vincent


On Tue, Jul 9, 2019 at 6:49 PM jdow <jdow@...> wrote:
I've been using Linux since the 90s - RedHat Hurricane I think it was.

It ain't ready for prime time is my opinion. It's a pain in the patootie to use
for some things. Audio is particularly "iffy".

{o.o}

On 20190709 17:17:19, doug wrote:
>
>
> On 07/09/2019 06:45 PM, jdow wrote:
>> Incidentally, if Windows takes 10 where I cannot tolerate I won't be
>> going back to 7. I'll be going to Linux as dreadful as it may be.
>>
>> {o.o}
>>
> Hi, Joanne--
>
> I have been using Linux just about exclusively for at least the last ten years.
> It is not, in my estimation, dreadful. It has the advantage that things are not
> hidden under infinite layers of goto boxes in the GUI. You can find and get
> almost any kind of software that you might want, for either rpm or deb systems,
> altho I prefer rpm. I used PCLinuxOS up until a recent "upgrade" crashed my
> system, and I discovered that the latest available version--and all the
> available software for it--has been effectively castrated! Many of the apps that
> I used on a regular basis are no longer available, and many of these are no
> longer installable even if you get them from rpmfind, as the
> libs are not installable. I have no idea why this was instituted, but
> I am now getting to know OpenSUSE Tumbleweed. I admit to having a problem
> installing a working Epson printer, even tho its PPD file is
> in the distro already. (Printer is found, ink levels shown, but printing is
> unavailable, as is scanning from the same device.) An HP LaserJet came right up.
> Everything else that I need or want is installed and working. The software
> interface--YAST--is strange to me,
> but seems to be useable, and the standard Linux installation tool--
> apt-get install--works fine. You can even run Windows in a "window"
> I guess you'd call it, but I would never even try that; I'd think it
> would be asking for trouble! One thing that seems to be missing in
> the latest Windows release--I don't think there is any way to turn off
> fast boot, which means you can no longer access your Windows directories
> from Linux. (Fast boot means there are always Windows files open, even when the
> machine is shut down.)
>
> --doug, WA2SAY
>
> PS: If there is some specific software that you need, I'll see if I know of a
> Linux version that I have used and works. There is, for instance, a drafting
> program that mimics Autocad, and there is a
> good text reader for scanned-in documents. I have, however, bought
> an office suite for word processing and spread-sheet reading/creating.
> That's the ONLY thing I bought for Linux.
>
>
>



jdow
 

Don't run a router without it, though. Use an older but still working PC. Load Centos 7 or Centos 8. Build up your router functions around it. Been doing that since RedHat Hurricane which was labeled 5.2 before the numbers were recycled, which is "Linux level confusing" (tm). (Linux, the world where if it works, they fix it.)

{o.o}

On 20190709 18:57:43, vincent wrote:
I'm with you !!!
Vincent
On Tue, Jul 9, 2019 at 6:49 PM jdow <jdow@... <mailto:jdow@...>> wrote:
I've been using Linux since the 90s - RedHat Hurricane I think it was.
It ain't ready for prime time is my opinion. It's a pain in the patootie to use
for some things. Audio is particularly "iffy".
{o.o}
On 20190709 17:17:19, doug wrote:
>
>
> On 07/09/2019 06:45 PM, jdow wrote:
>> Incidentally, if Windows takes 10 where I cannot tolerate I won't be
>> going back to 7. I'll be going to Linux as dreadful as it may be.
>>
>> {o.o}
>>
> Hi, Joanne--
>
> I have been using Linux just about exclusively for at least the last ten
years.
> It is not, in my estimation, dreadful. It has the advantage that things
are not
> hidden under infinite layers of goto boxes in the GUI. You can find and get
> almost any kind of software that you might want, for either rpm or deb
systems,
> altho I prefer rpm. I used PCLinuxOS up until a recent "upgrade" crashed my
> system, and I discovered that the latest available version--and all the
> available software for it--has been effectively castrated! Many of the
apps that
> I used on a regular basis are no longer available, and many of these are no
> longer installable even if you get them from rpmfind, as the
> libs are not installable. I have no idea why this was instituted, but
> I am now getting to know OpenSUSE Tumbleweed. I admit to having a problem
> installing a working Epson printer, even tho its PPD file is
> in the distro already. (Printer is found, ink levels shown, but printing is
> unavailable, as is scanning from the same device.) An HP LaserJet came
right up.
> Everything else that I need or want is installed and working. The software
> interface--YAST--is strange to me,
> but seems to be useable, and the standard Linux installation tool--
> apt-get install--works fine. You can even run Windows in a "window"
> I guess you'd call it, but I would never even try that; I'd think it
> would be asking for trouble! One thing that seems to be missing in
> the latest Windows release--I don't think there is any way to turn off
> fast boot, which means you can no longer access your Windows directories
> from Linux. (Fast boot means there are always Windows files open, even
when the
> machine is shut down.)
>
> --doug, WA2SAY
>
> PS: If there is some specific software that you need, I'll see if I know
of a
> Linux version that I have used and works. There is, for instance, a drafting
> program that mimics Autocad, and there is a
> good text reader for scanned-in documents. I have, however, bought
> an office suite for word processing and spread-sheet reading/creating.
> That's the ONLY thing I bought for Linux.
>
>
>