Onboard graphics conflict


Noel
 

Good morning. No real questions here, just a cautionary tale with a hopefully happy ending.

Some background on my computer proficiency or lack thereof. I regularly (at least bi-monthly) update software and check drivers. I am not totally comfortable with "inner workings" but a firm believer in Google being my friend. Through necessity and with great dread I managed to totally re-install W10 and all my paraphernalia last year. It took a couple of days and a few attempts (local Windows account, POP3 vs iMap, Office 16 desktop vs live account, etc!) but I got there in the end.

A couple of years ago I bought a new shack computer - Dell XPS8930, i7-8700. To run SDR Console to its best advantage I topped it off with an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 with 6GB onboard. And I've been mighty pleased with the whole package, except for its propensity to work better than the vacuum cleaner in sucking dust. But that's another story...

I don't remember when the issue first surfaced. Maybe it was immediate but possibly only after a few months. Ocasionally I would hear a muffled "blump" or burble from the inards. Not through the monitor speaker where all audio is piped. Just one short sound and the cursor would freeze on the screen for 2 or 3 seconds. Then cursor movement would resume, CPU load (fan noise) would peak momentarily and back to ops-normal. This might happen a couple of times a day. Annoying and perplexing but not a show-stopper. Of concern because these things tend not to get better by themselves.

Every once in a while both screens would go black and recover after 5 seconds but leave SDRC crashed. That was of concern. I didn't believe this to be an SDRC issue but rather a computer hardware or driver fault.

Having reviewed Event Viewer I found this message common to all my events "Display driver nvlddmkm stopped responding and has successfully recovered". These were always preceded by a few LiveKernelEvents. Googling the Nvidia message revealed this to be a long standing issue seemingly not addressed or resolved by Nvidia. Plenty of advice from various sources - none of which gave me any resolution. Nvidia drivers are always up to date on this PC. Over many months I have tried numerous variations of settings without success.

I moved to the more stable Nvidia Studio driver version rather than the Gaming version and also removed the GeForce interface. But the problem persisted. Recently I have been doing quite a bit of ALE and HFDL decoding using multiple instances of SDRC and 20 or so Rx. Particularly annoying when that lot crashes which it was doing on a regular basis.

Last week it occurred to me that the motherboard has onboard graphics (in this case Intel UHD 630) which are automatically disabled with the addition of another graphics card. A quick check of the display adapters in device manager showed this was not the case! I have disabled this device and hey presto not a "blump", "burble" or crash since. It's now been 4 days.....touch wood.

I can only assume that Intel and Nvidia were coming into conflict from time to time. And hopefully I haven't jinxed everything by putting pen to paper.

Has anyone else experienced similar graphics issues?

Regards
--
Noel

Clacton, southeast England
N51.78 E1.14
Perseus, SDRPlay RSP2, Icom R8500
FCDPro+, BCT15X, AR8000.
pa0rdt, mini-windom, discone


David J Taylor
 

On 23/05/2022 09:05, Noel via groups.io wrote:
I can only assume that Intel and Nvidia were coming into conflict from time to
time. And hopefully I haven't jinxed everything by putting pen to paper.

Has anyone else experienced similar graphics issues?

Regards
--
Noel
No, but Windows-10 allows a choice of graphics possibly on a per-program basis.
The default is that Windows selects - I don't know how but perhaps it's when
the CPU is busy with graphics it moves to the Nvidia card. I have an NVidia
card (lower power and lower cost) in a couple of PCs, and I haven't noticed the
issue leaving Windows-10 to manage it. I do run SDRconsole, but not very often
as I prefer SDRangel, SDR++ and SDR#.

Thanks for the story, Noel!

David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv


jdow
 

You have a serious problem with your computer, not the software running on it. At least that is my conclusion when you mention a blump noise from inside the computer. In order of seriousness this may be a fan or fans going bad. It may be internal power connectors becoming "old" and loose. It may be your disk drive telling you "It's over, baby."

The fans are more or less easy to test. Pull the covers off so you can see blades spin or feel solid air movement from all the fans. Power it up. Make sure no fans are stalled. Replace any stalled fans. Then cross your fingers you do not hear the "blump" again.

Unfortunately  experience suggests you purchase a disk for backing up your computer. If you use something like same day delivery you MIGHT discover you were happy to do that. But, then, the disk in the computer may last another few months or more. The ideal disk to purchase depends on your machine having some blue USB connectors, USB3. If it has that get a drive larger than what is in your computer and that is in a separate enclosure with USB3 capability. Then copy all your data over to that disk. If you make it a double size or more disk then use a backup tool, even the one built into 7 or 10, to take a complete backup of your system. Macrium Reflect is what I use. The free version takes a complete backup and, I believe, can mount the backup data as another disk that you can browse to get all your data back. I'd do that first then try to manually save data from that point until you can replace the disk in the Dell or get a new computer. (Unfortunately Dell computers make heavy use of non-standard parts AND they have a bad reputation in recent years for the consumer (and gaming) markets. At least they mostly function mostly reliably. Their repairability is poor. Disk replacement, though, may be quite easy with a same size or larger disk. My partner's Dell "take home from work to work from home" machine was easy for drive replacement.) But - BACK UP FIRST then worry about repair or replace.

{^_^}

On 20220523 01:05:09, Noel via groups.io wrote:
Good morning. No real questions here, just a cautionary tale with a hopefully happy ending.

Some background on my computer proficiency or lack thereof. I regularly (at least bi-monthly) update software and check drivers. I am not totally comfortable with "inner workings" but a firm believer in Google being my friend. Through necessity and with great dread I managed to totally re-install W10 and all my paraphernalia last year. It took a couple of days and a few attempts (local Windows account, POP3 vs iMap, Office 16 desktop vs live account, etc!) but I got there in the end.

A couple of years ago I bought a new shack computer - Dell XPS8930, i7-8700. To run SDR Console to its best advantage I topped it off with an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 with 6GB onboard. And I've been mighty pleased with the whole package, except for its propensity to work better than the vacuum cleaner in sucking dust. But that's another story...

I don't remember when the issue first surfaced. Maybe it was immediate but possibly only after a few months. Ocasionally I would hear a muffled "blump" or burble from the inards. Not through the monitor speaker where all audio is piped. Just one short sound and the cursor would freeze on the screen for 2 or 3 seconds. Then cursor movement would resume, CPU load (fan noise) would peak momentarily and back to ops-normal. This might happen a couple of times a day. Annoying and perplexing but not a show-stopper. Of concern because these things tend not to get better by themselves.

Every once in a while both screens would go black and recover after 5 seconds but leave SDRC crashed. That was of concern. I didn't believe this to be an SDRC issue but rather a computer hardware or driver fault.

Having reviewed Event Viewer I found this message common to all my events "Display driver nvlddmkm stopped responding and has successfully recovered". These were always preceded by a few LiveKernelEvents. Googling the Nvidia message revealed this to be a long standing issue seemingly not addressed or resolved by Nvidia. Plenty of advice from various sources - none of which gave me any resolution. Nvidia drivers are always up to date on this PC. Over many months I have tried numerous variations of settings without success.

I moved to the more stable Nvidia Studio driver version rather than the Gaming version and also removed the GeForce interface. But the problem persisted. Recently I have been doing quite a bit of ALE and HFDL decoding using multiple instances of SDRC and 20 or so Rx. Particularly annoying when that lot crashes which it was doing on a regular basis.

Last week it occurred to me that the motherboard has onboard graphics (in this case Intel UHD 630) which are automatically disabled with the addition of another graphics card. A quick check of the display adapters in device manager showed this was not the case! I have disabled this device and hey presto not a "blump", "burble" or crash since. It's now been 4 days.....touch wood.

I can only assume that Intel and Nvidia were coming into conflict from time to time. And hopefully I haven't jinxed everything by putting pen to paper.

Has anyone else experienced similar graphics issues?

Regards
--
Noel

Clacton, southeast England
N51.78 E1.14
Perseus, SDRPlay RSP2, Icom R8500
FCDPro+, BCT15X, AR8000.
pa0rdt, mini-windom, discone
event viewer.jpg

LiveKernelEvent.jpg

sdr console crash.jpg


Noel
 

Thanks for the advice and suggestions, Joanne

- The noise is not mechanical. I have checked and cleaned all fans a few times. They're OK
- the operating drive is SSD
- all data backups are in hand. Weekly or at worst bi-weekly (to be sure, to be sure!). I use 2x 2TB WD external usb3 drives and alternate them for backups
- in the past I have made OS backup copies but doubt whether I'd manage to re-mount them in an emergency :-) Having now done a complete re-install from scratch that might be my preferred route if push came to shove.

I'm still keeping my fingers crossed that disabling the onboard graphics has done the trick......time will be the arbiter.

Regards
--
Noel

Clacton, southeast England
N51.78 E1.14
Perseus, SDRPlay RSP2, Icom R8500
FCDPro+, BCT15X, AR8000.
pa0rdt, mini-windom, discone


jdow
 

Maybe - I have run into problems with both graphics card and onboard graphics enabled on a machine intended for video work. The video processing got shunted to the wrong card and glitched. I could not get priorities correct with Win 7 so I killed the on board video in the BIOS. I never got a "blump" noise or any other noise than fans and disks operating normally. The "blump" leads me to suspect a sudden head retraction and recovery. The head retraction can shake the drive. The drive couples this sound to the chassis which acts as a speaker. The seemingly random sets of failures could also be related to a drive problem. But, it could also be simple resource contention as well.

{^_^}

On 20220524 00:42:23, Noel via groups.io wrote:
Thanks for the advice and suggestions, Joanne

- The noise is not mechanical. I have checked and cleaned all fans a few times. They're OK
- the operating drive is SSD
- all data backups are in hand. Weekly or at worst bi-weekly (to be sure, to be sure!). I use 2x 2TB WD external usb3 drives and alternate them for backups
- in the past I have made OS backup copies but doubt whether I'd manage to re-mount them in an emergency :-) Having now done a complete re-install from scratch that might be my preferred route if push came to shove.

I'm still keeping my fingers crossed that disabling the onboard graphics has done the trick......time will be the arbiter.

Regards
--
Noel

Clacton, southeast England
N51.78 E1.14
Perseus, SDRPlay RSP2, Icom R8500
FCDPro+, BCT15X, AR8000.
pa0rdt, mini-windom, discone


Ken Sejkora
 

Some graphics cards also have fans on them to cool the GPU, as well as some dedicated fans on the CPU cooler.  Those smaller fans can be overlooked when cleaning the case/system cooling fans.  On some of my older PCs, those small CPU cooling fans were more prone to failure than the case cooling fans.  There’s also likely a cooling fan inside the power supply, which can get caked up with dust.  Any of those can produce a ‘clunk’ sound.  On several occasions, I’ve seen a CPU cooling fan start up , run a while, then slow down and have erratic rotation, and finally stop.  Then on its own, it would produce a ‘clunk’ sound and start spinning again. Dust in the fan bearings would cause an intermittent slowing/stopping/starting fan rotation.

 

As Joann mentioned, a ‘clunk’ sound is also produced by internal hard drives (non-SSD) on the verge of failure.  However, it sounds as though you don’t have any internal hard drives based on your description below.

 

Lastly, perhaps the sound is being produced by a small speaker or piezo element connected to the motherboard to produce the POST beeps.  However, I’m not sure why that speaker would activate during normal operation, unless it is sounding off due to some kind of error.


Good luck.

 

Ken, WBØOCV

 

From: Noel via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2022 03:42 AM
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] Onboard graphics conflict

 

Thanks for the advice and suggestions, Joanne

- The noise is not mechanical. I have checked and cleaned all fans a few times. They're OK
- the operating drive is SSD
- all data backups are in hand. Weekly or at worst bi-weekly (to be sure, to be sure!). I use 2x 2TB WD external usb3 drives and alternate them for backups
- in the past I have made OS backup copies but doubt whether I'd manage to re-mount them in an emergency :-) Having now done a complete re-install from scratch that might be my preferred route if push came to shove.

I'm still keeping my fingers crossed that disabling the onboard graphics has done the trick......time will be the arbiter.

Regards
--
Noel