Topics

Multiple receivers stitched together #sdrplay #future

Martin
 

Reworking of previous posting to incorporate appropriate hashtags as suggested.
 
I've been using it with an SDR Play RSP1A and the 8MHz BW display is luxurious.
 
I'm a great fan of the KiWi SDR and I really like the ability to view the whole of the 0-32MHz spectrum in one go, so this got me thinking.........
 
Would it be possible to run say four SDR Plays and get SDR console to 'stitch' the four swathes of spectrum together to form one continuous chunk ?
 
i.e. 4 x 8 = 32MHz of spectrum.
 
The individual receivers could then be set anywhere in the spectrum.
 
Regards,
 
Martin - G8JNJ

Kriss Kliegle
 

Serious question Martin...
   What useful purpose does one get seeing 32MHz of spectrum on one screen? I can't imagine how one 'tunes' to anything but just the BC stations that are 10kHz wide, even then that would be hard to do since they will be all smeared together in lumps throughout the various sections at which they TX. Then comes the computing power, and having multiple monitors to display such a swath of bandwidth. Other than the 'Wow' factor, I don't see what useful purpose it would serve.

   No, I'm not berating you and please don't take my response that way. I'm just asking why, that's all, no need go any deeper into my response.

73 Kriss KA1GJU

Tracey Gardner
 

 
Hello Kriss
 
Are you assuming that Martin wants monitor 0-32MHz?
If that is the case I would tend to agree with you.
 
But perhaps Martin and others wish to monitor the airband or another wide area of VHF spectrum?
I can see that would make sense.
 
I'm toying with the idea of running four or five AirSpys to monitor 50MHz, 70MHz, 144MHz and 432MHz and trying to get two or possibly three bands of waterfalls stacked vertically above each other on a couple of monitors.
I could get away with Airspy Minis for the 50-144MHz bands but I would probably split 432MHz into two using Airspy R2s
 
73s Tracey G5VU
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Kriss Kliegle <kliegle@...>
Reply-To: <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io>
To: <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io>
Sent: 29/01/2020 13:03:27
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] Multiple receivers stitched together #future #sdrplay

Serious question Martin...
   What useful purpose does one get seeing 32MHz of spectrum on one screen? I can't imagine how one 'tunes' to anything but just the BC stations that are 10kHz wide, even then that would be hard to do since they will be all smeared together in lumps throughout the various sections at which they TX. Then comes the computing power, and having multiple monitors to display such a swath of bandwidth. Other than the 'Wow' factor, I don't see what useful purpose it would serve.

   No, I'm not berating you and please don't take my response that way. I'm just asking why, that's all, no need go any deeper into my response.

73 Kriss KA1GJU

_._,_._,_

Kriss Kliegle
 

   He did state, "I'm a great fan of the KiWi SDR and I really like the ability to view the whole of the 0-32MHz spectrum in one go..." So I assumed he meant the 0-32 MHz spectrum, which is LF,MW, and HF spectrum. I could see it might prove useful on VHF or UHF, but other than ham freqs and NOAA WX radio, 95% of signals are P25 or data, here in the USA. Those digital signals are hard on the ol' ears to listen to! 🙉🙉🙉

Here's a 760 kHz slice of VHF locally, 151MHz +/-, note the lack of any analog signals:



Now here's a snapshot of a Kiwi SDR if full 0-32 MHz, this was the point I was referring to, a whole bunch of parallel lines at least the in the 0-18MHz due to the MUF at this time of day locally at 1400z. At this view (0-32 MHz), one cannot tell the QRM streaks versus the real signal streaks due to the granularity of the samples. 





73 Kriss KA1GJU

Paul Gulliver
 

Kriss,

Well for me, 2 sdr's linked together would be useful, I monitor HFDL and those transmissions can be on anywhere between 4Mhz and 21MHz at the same time - different aircraft, different ground stations.

I've often wondered if it would be possible to run 2 instances of SDRC each looking at a different RSP1A - not sure if I might run into problems with drivers

I wouldn't actually want to "look" at the full bandwidth as I know what frequencies should be in use - just want to set up receivers (probably 6 to 8) across the full spectrum.

Paul


On 29/01/2020 at 13:03, Kriss Kliegle <kliegle@...> wrote:
Serious question Martin...
   What useful purpose does one get seeing 32MHz of spectrum on one screen? I can't imagine how one 'tunes' to anything but just the BC stations that are 10kHz wide, even then that would be hard to do since they will be all smeared together in lumps throughout the various sections at which they TX. Then comes the computing power, and having multiple monitors to display such a swath of bandwidth. Other than the 'Wow' factor, I don't see what useful purpose it would serve.

   No, I'm not berating you and please don't take my response that way. I'm just asking why, that's all, no need go any deeper into my response.

73 Kriss KA1GJU


Max
 

Hi Paul

Multiple instances of SDRC is no problem at all, in fact I was about to suggest it to you. Many here do it routinely as far as I know. I have done with RTL-SDR dongle and my RSP2Pro. It's no issue at all. Of course each instance can have multiple virtual receivers within itself.

Try it!

Best

Max

Simon Brown
 

Hi,

 

In theory this could be done but would be a programming challenge.

 

If you really want greater bandwidth *and* a quality receiver consider the ELAD S3 which will deliver 20MHz pot-alias filter of display. S3 shipping date in unknown, I have one here and it’s a stunner.

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of Martin via Groups.Io
Sent: 29 January 2020 10:26
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: [SDR-Radio] Multiple receivers stitched together #future #sdrplay

 

Reworking of previous posting to incorporate appropriate hashtags as suggested.

 

I've been using it with an SDR Play RSP1A and the 8MHz BW display is luxurious.

 

I'm a great fan of the KiWi SDR and I really like the ability to view the whole of the 0-32MHz spectrum in one go, so this got me thinking.........

 

Would it be possible to run say four SDR Plays and get SDR console to 'stitch' the four swathes of spectrum together to form one continuous chunk ?

 

i.e. 4 x 8 = 32MHz of spectrum.

 

The individual receivers could then be set anywhere in the spectrum.

 

Regards,

 

Martin - G8JNJ

Simon Brown
 

Well,

 

[Thinking Aloud] – now that I understand how a video recorder works, maybe I though ‘in theory’ write a program which consolidates displays from other programs. Interesting…

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tracey Gardner via Groups.Io
Sent: 29 January 2020 13:23
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] Multiple receivers stitched together #future #sdrplay

 

 

Hello Kriss

 

Are you assuming that Martin wants monitor 0-32MHz?

If that is the case I would tend to agree with you.

 

But perhaps Martin and others wish to monitor the airband or another wide area of VHF spectrum?

I can see that would make sense.

 

I'm toying with the idea of running four or five AirSpys to monitor 50MHz, 70MHz, 144MHz and 432MHz and trying to get two or possibly three bands of waterfalls stacked vertically above each other on a couple of monitors.

I could get away with Airspy Minis for the 50-144MHz bands but I would probably split 432MHz into two using Airspy R2s

 

73s Tracey G5VU

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Kriss Kliegle <kliegle@...>

Sent: 29/01/2020 13:03:27

Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] Multiple receivers stitched together #future #sdrplay


Serious question Martin...
   What useful purpose does one get seeing 32MHz of spectrum on one screen? I can't imagine how one 'tunes' to anything but just the BC stations that are 10kHz wide, even then that would be hard to do since they will be all smeared together in lumps throughout the various sections at which they TX. Then comes the computing power, and having multiple monitors to display such a swath of bandwidth. Other than the 'Wow' factor, I don't see what useful purpose it would serve.

   No, I'm not berating you and please don't take my response that way. I'm just asking why, that's all, no need go any deeper into my response.

73 Kriss KA1GJU

Tracey Gardner
 

 
Hello Kriss
 
Yes you're quite correct about Martin's remarks and the significance of his remarks about the Kiwi SDR hadn't really sunk into my aged brain, so my apologies.
I can look at 0-30MHz or 0-50MHz on my Winradio G31, but as you say it isn't a lot of use.
 
73s Tracey G5VU
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Kriss Kliegle <kliegle@...>
Reply-To: <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io>
To: <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io>
Sent: 29/01/2020 14:26:52
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] Multiple receivers stitched together #future #sdrplay

   He did state, "I'm a great fan of the KiWi SDR and I really like the ability to view the whole of the 0-32MHz spectrum in one go..." So I assumed he meant the 0-32 MHz spectrum, which is LF,MW, and HF spectrum. I could see it might prove useful on VHF or UHF, but other than ham freqs and NOAA WX radio, 95% of signals are P25 or data, here in the USA. Those digital signals are hard on the ol' ears to listen to! 🙉🙉🙉

Here's a 760 kHz slice of VHF locally, 151MHz +/-, note the lack of any analog signals:



Now here's a snapshot of a Kiwi SDR if full 0-32 MHz, this was the point I was referring to, a whole bunch of parallel lines at least the in the 0-18MHz due to the MUF at this time of day locally at 1400z. At this view (0-32 MHz), one cannot tell the QRM streaks versus the real signal streaks due to the granularity of the samples. 





73 Kriss KA1GJU

Martin
 
Edited

On Wed, Jan 29, 2020 at 02:26 PM, Kriss Kliegle wrote:
really like the ability to view the whole of the 0-32MHz spectrum in one go..." So I assumed he meant the 0-32 MHz spectrum,
Hi All,

Yes I really do like to see the whole spectrum, as it gives an instant view of propagation conditions and you can often spot 'patterns', for example just see how many unusual signals there are in this 10MHz wide screen grab, such as the many diagonal stripes from Ionosounders.

Note that I have adjusted the colour range in SDR Console to highlight the diagonal stripes.


 

There are also other visible instances of synchronised burst signals, OTHR and hopping transmissions that often go unnoticed when only viewing narrow swathes of spectrum.

I have spotted many new signals, by simply watching the 0-32MHz waterfall on my KiWi and seeing blocks of transmissions, popping up in sequence as they scan through pre-set channels across the HF bands.
 
However the main reason is to allow multiple receivers anywhere in the 0-32MHz spectrum to be run concurrently, in one instance of SDR Console, so that all the controls track in one 'session' and any memories or tagged frequencies are all shared and can be recalled and stored in the same workspace.

If you are a keen on monitoring utility traffic or ALE networks, it's useful to be able to listen or log multiple channels throughout typically 2 - 25MHz. Having the ability to do this within one control panel rather than multiple sessions to cover different frequency ranges, makes it much easier to operate and administer.

Regards,

Martin - G8JNJ

Martin
 

Hi All,

I should also have made it clear that although I specifically mentioned the SDR Play and 0-32MHz in my example, I had envisaged being able to apply the same sort of of thing to other receivers such as RTL dongles, and other frequency ranges, such as the whole of the 88-108MHz FM broadcast band or 108-139MHz VHF aircraft band to name but two.

Regards,

Martin - G8JNJ

Simon Brown
 

Well,

 

ELAD S3 can display the whole of VHF with good dynamic range, you can display 50MHz with the bladeRF MkII on VHF+.

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of Martin via Groups.Io
Sent: 29 January 2020 17:24
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] Multiple receivers stitched together #future #sdrplay

 

Hi All,

I should also have made it clear that although I specifically mentioned the SDR Play and 0-32MHz in my example, I had envisaged being able to apply the same sort of of thing to other receivers such as RTL dongles, and other frequency ranges, such as the whole of the 88-108MHz FM broadcast band or 108-139MHz VHF aircraft band to name but two.

Regards,

Martin - G8JNJ

barry williams
 

Kriss,

One advantage for a wide shot of spectrum is to watch for systems that skip around. There are a few that jump up or down the spectrum, leaving IDs or ALE soundings. They used to be tough to track.



Barry


-----------------------------------------

From: "Kriss Kliegle"
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday January 29 2020 7:03:42AM
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] Multiple receivers stitched together #future #sdrplay

Serious question Martin...
   What useful purpose does one get seeing 32MHz of spectrum on one screen? I can't imagine how one 'tunes' to anything but just the BC stations that are 10kHz wide, even then that would be hard to do since they will be all smeared together in lumps throughout the various sections at which they TX. Then comes the computing power, and having multiple monitors to display such a swath of bandwidth. Other than the 'Wow' factor, I don't see what useful purpose it would serve.

   No, I'm not berating you and please don't take my response that way. I'm just asking why, that's all, no need go any deeper into my response.

73 Kriss KA1GJU

n2msqrp
 

I like to "twist the knobs" when working at my desk to see what's around. The Wideband option of the QS1R sdr receiver gives me the option of seeing up to 60 Mhz bandwidth of the receiver. See the attached picture. In this example I saw a signal around 24 Mhz, clicked on it and see it as a CODAR ocean radar station.

Having a wide spectrum also helps me when characterizing RFI interference as well as detecting activity on a certain band.

I also use it as a panoramic display for my K3 via Omnirig.

The QS1R is a nice receiver with good dynamic range. Sorry it was discontinued and wished it was supported by SDRC.

Mike N2MS


On January 29, 2020 at 8:03 AM Kriss Kliegle <kliegle@...> wrote:

Serious question Martin...
   What useful purpose does one get seeing 32MHz of spectrum on one screen?

jdow
 

Bug detection in the HF region. (You'd want even more bandwidth for serious bug detection, though.)

{o.o} (Another thing I poked a nose into over my career.)

On 20200129 05:03:27, Kriss Kliegle wrote:
Serious question Martin...
   What useful purpose does one get seeing 32MHz of spectrum on one screen? I can't imagine how one 'tunes' to anything but just the BC stations that are 10kHz wide, even then that would be hard to do since they will be all smeared together in lumps throughout the various sections at which they TX. Then comes the computing power, and having multiple monitors to display such a swath of bandwidth. Other than the 'Wow' factor, I don't see what useful purpose it would serve.
   No, I'm not berating you and please don't take my response that way. I'm just asking why, that's all, no need go any deeper into my response.
73 Kriss KA1GJU

jdow
 

For really wide bandwidths on a single SDR having the ability to display the spectrum broken up on multiple lines. You can see the whole thing with increased resolution. That might be painful to design a code, however.

{^_^}

On 20200129 10:09:47, n2msqrp wrote:
I like to "twist the knobs" when working at my desk to see what's around. The Wideband option of the QS1R sdr receiver gives me the option of seeing up to 60 Mhz bandwidth of the receiver. See the attached picture. In this example I saw a signal around 24 Mhz, clicked on it and see it as a CODAR ocean radar station.
Having a wide spectrum also helps me when characterizing RFI interference as well as detecting activity on a certain band.
I also use it as a panoramic display for my K3 via Omnirig.
The QS1R is a nice receiver with good dynamic range. Sorry it was discontinued and wished it was supported by SDRC.
Mike N2MS

On January 29, 2020 at 8:03 AM Kriss Kliegle <kliegle@...> wrote:

Serious question Martin...
   What useful purpose does one get seeing 32MHz of spectrum on one screen?
QS1R Wideband.png

M0ZEH
 

Hi Simon, 
Lovely receiver but at £950 I think it would only be used by proffesionals not amateurs.
Thanks Steve m0zeh 

On Wed, Jan 29, 2020 at 04:29 PM, 

 

If you really want greater bandwidth *and* a quality receiver consider the ELAD S3 which will deliver 20MHz pot-alias filter of display. S3 shipping date in unknown, I have one here and it’s a stunner.

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

 

 

Simon Brown
 

Hi,

 

Don’t agree. There are many SWLs who use such RX – Perseus was not a lot cheaper.

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of M0ZEH
Sent: 30 January 2020 07:45
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] Multiple receivers stitched together #future #sdrplay

 

Hi Simon, 
Lovely receiver but at £950 I think it would only be used by proffesionals not amateurs.
Thanks Steve m0zeh 

On Wed, Jan 29, 2020 at 04:29 PM, 

 

If you really want greater bandwidth *and* a quality receiver consider the ELAD S3 which will deliver 20MHz pot-alias filter of display. S3 shipping date in unknown, I have one here and it’s a stunner.

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

 

 

Max
 

Steve

With Flex SDR-transceivers retailing at between about 3k and 7k GBP, and a fairly average price for "black box" transceivers of 1.5k + I must say i am constantly amazed by what people are prepared to spend on kit.

Not me though...... Half the fun of radio is trying to wring out performance on a budget!

73

Max

Siegfried Jackstien
 

there is a software that exactly does that ... stitch together 2 megs chunks to a wider scan

(nuts about nets ... software is "touchstone")

that soft works with the rf expolrer ... or with any rtl dongle

(i know there are a few other scanner apps also for the rtl dongle)

greetz sigi dg9bfc



Am 30.01.2020 um 01:29 schrieb jdow:

For really wide bandwidths on a single SDR having the ability to display the spectrum broken up on multiple lines. You can see the whole thing with increased resolution. That might be painful to design a code, however.

{^_^}

On 20200129 10:09:47, n2msqrp wrote:
I like to "twist the knobs" when working at my desk to see what's around. The Wideband option of the QS1R sdr receiver gives me the option of seeing up to 60 Mhz bandwidth of the receiver. See the attached picture. In this example I saw a signal around 24 Mhz, clicked on it and see it as a CODAR ocean radar station.

Having a wide spectrum also helps me when characterizing RFI interference as well as detecting activity on a certain band.

I also use it as a panoramic display for my K3 via Omnirig.

The QS1R is a nice receiver with good dynamic range. Sorry it was discontinued and wished it was supported by SDRC.

Mike N2MS


On January 29, 2020 at 8:03 AM Kriss Kliegle <kliegle@...> wrote:

Serious question Martin...
   What useful purpose does one get seeing 32MHz of spectrum on one screen?

QS1R Wideband.png