Solar Eclipse and Weather Sats


dwight_talley
 

I lived in Stuttgart Germany during the Solar Eclipse of Aug 11, 1999.  Tour companies brought people from all over Europe to see this event. (charged them a lot of money also).  But being it was a typical day there, clouds covered the event and only cleared afterwards.  By chance a weather sat was overhead at the same time and I was able to watch the shadow of the eclipse move across the landscape and clouds.  I cant remember if it was a Russian weather sat or an American one but they operated in the 137 mhz range. 

Might be a good project to try to see what you can receive of the event using the different SDR software programs that are available.


Dwight


Joe Puma
 

Very interesting idea. Its probably NOAA satellites I have a set up that I can receive them pretty well. I'll have to check all of the trying to see if there will be any in my area during the eclipse.  

Joe
KD2NFC 


Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 11, 2017, at 10:44 AM, dwight_talley <dwight_talley@...> wrote:

I lived in Stuttgart Germany during the Solar Eclipse of Aug 11, 1999.  Tour companies brought people from all over Europe to see this event. (charged them a lot of money also).  But being it was a typical day there, clouds covered the event and only cleared afterwards.  By chance a weather sat was overhead at the same time and I was able to watch the shadow of the eclipse move across the landscape and clouds.  I cant remember if it was a Russian weather sat or an American one but they operated in the 137 mhz range. 

Might be a good project to try to see what you can receive of the event using the different SDR software programs that are available.


Dwight


NR4U Bob AFMARS
 

On 8/11/2017 12:56, Joe Puma wrote:
Very interesting idea. Its probably NOAA satellites I have a set up that
I can receive them pretty well. I'll have to check all of the trying to
see if there will be any in my area during the eclipse.
What program would I use with my RTL and SDRC to be ab le to display
that wx Sat downlink?

--
73,
Bob KD7YZ


dwight_talley
 

I did this 18 years ago, before the invention of RTLs.  I used an Icom R-7000 receiver.  Now we have much better software and hardware.

Here is a link on how to do it:

http://www.rtl-sdr.com/rtl-sdr-tutorial-receiving-noaa-weather-satellite-images/


Dwight


David Woodward
 

Wxtoimg is a good and fairly simple program. 

On Aug 12, 2017 1:14 PM, "dwight_talley" <dwight_talley@...> wrote:
I did this 18 years ago, before the invention of RTLs.  I used an Icom R-7000 receiver.  Now we have much better software and hardware.

Here is a link on how to do it:

http://www.rtl-sdr.com/rtl-sdr-tutorial-receiving-noaa-weather-satellite-images/


Dwight


NR4U Bob AFMARS
 

On 8/12/2017 19:49, David Woodward wrote:
Wxtoimg is a good and fairly simple program.

Dwight
I downloaded this. But I see no way to make it work with either the RTL
nor SDRC. Am I missing something here?

--
73,
Bob KD7YZ


Norm n3ykf <normanlizeth@...>
 

Virtual audio cable of some type. Many on the net.

RTL-SDR ->receiver program->virtual audio cable->program to consume
audio (wxtoimg)

This is the virtual cable I use: http://www.vb-audio.com/Cable/index.htm

I use HDSDR to convert the samples to audio. Set the audio output to
one end of a cable, the other is the input of your favorite program.
In this case, wxtoimg.

Sounds like a fun time. Who said ham radio was just decrepit oldsters
complaining about colonoscopies?

Norm n3ykf

On Sat, Aug 12, 2017 at 9:50 PM, KD7YZ Bob <kd7yz@...> wrote:
On 8/12/2017 19:49, David Woodward wrote:
Wxtoimg is a good and fairly simple program.

Dwight
I downloaded this. But I see no way to make it work with either the RTL
nor SDRC. Am I missing something here?

--
73,
Bob KD7YZ




David Woodward
 

not sure of your setup but, you may have to download virtual cable so the program has a way to hear your sdr.
 I've been using sdr and WxtoImg for years....it does work well.
 An antenna dedicated to the 137 mhz band will help tremendously. 

On Aug 12, 2017 10:51 PM, "KD7YZ Bob" <kd7yz@...> wrote:
On 8/12/2017 19:49, David Woodward wrote:
> Wxtoimg is a good and fairly simple program.
>
>     Dwight
> I downloaded this. But I see no way to make it work with either the RTL
nor SDRC. Am I missing something here?

--
73,
Bob KD7YZ





NR4U Bob AFMARS
 

On 8/12/2017 19:49, David Woodward wrote:
Wxtoimg is a good and fairly simple program.

On Aug 12, 2017 1:14 PM, "dwight_talley" <dwight_talley@...
<mailto:dwight_talley@...>> wrote:

Here is a link on how to do it:

http://www.rtl-sdr.com/rtl-sdr-tutorial-receiving-noaa-weather-satellite-images/
<http://www.rtl-sdr.com/rtl-sdr-tutorial-receiving-noaa-weather-satellite-images/>


Dwight
thanks Dwight and David.
I just copied/printed my first Wx Sat picture off NOAA-19

using the link u gave for SDR and an RTL, and D/L'ing WxtoIMG, I got a
nice picture scan of pretty much Kentucky in the center.

been a Ham since '58 and never tried this.

--
73,
Bob KD7YZ


dwight_talley
 

That is great Bob. Years ago when I was doing this there were several weather sats, both American and Russian.  Now there are only a few running and all of the Russian ones are dead.  If you didn't have a radio like the ICOM, you had to build a crystal controlled radio to receive the sats and feed the sound to your computer.  Then they changed the frequencies and you had to try to find correct crystals.  I wished I had a dongle then.

Back in the late 90s you were also able to receive Geo Stationary Weather Sat signals.  I built a 1.5 meter dish in my back yard (yes you can use a surplus old-school sat TV dish instead but I wanted to see if I could do it) and put a coffee can at the point of the signal with a small antenna inside of it.  My ICOM radio was able to clearly hear the signal at 1,692 ghz.  Now the dongles we have today will be more sensitive and would work better. 

Here is a link to a photo of the eclipse of 2006 over Africa taken from a Geo Stationary sat:

2006 eclipse shadow over Africa

Here is some additional info for anyone who has the time to try the Geo stationary sats

Receiving full disk images of the Earth


David J Taylor
 

From: dwight_talley

That is great Bob. Years ago when I was doing this there were several weather sats, both American and Russian. Now there are only a few running and all of the Russian ones are dead. If you didn't have a radio like the ICOM, you had to build a crystal controlled radio to receive the sats and feed the sound to your computer. Then they changed the frequencies and you had to try to find correct crystals. I wished I had a dongle then.
[]
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Yes, there are still three NOAA satellites on APT (137 MHz), and at least one Russian one which is now delivering data digitally on the 137 MHz band using a coding called LRPT. Instead of two channels there are three, and the resolution is some ten times better, so the image quality on 137 MHz can approach that of the HRPT images which are still transmitted on 1.7 GHz by the NOAA satellites. They can be quite stunning, and you don't even need a tracking antenna. Yes, they can be received with a low-cost dongle, or an Airspy receiver (others are available).

There is a plug-in for SDR# which decodes the LRPT data, and a Doppler shift module as well (although I've not found this necessary). IIRC there's a decoder which could take an IQ file from SDR Console.

It's a pity that NOAA chose not to equip the newer satellites with a VHF facility, which would have allowed an omnidirectional antenna to be used (useful for ships as well as amateurs).

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software written to your requirements
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv


NR4U Bob AFMARS
 

On 8/13/2017 08:53, dwight_talley wrote:

I built a 1.5 meter dish in my back yard (yes you
can use a surplus old-school sat TV dish instead
I don't have a means with which to build a dish. But I wonder how
expensive it is to find one to ship .. they ought to be lightweight
enough. And I'm nowhere next to anywhere out here where the QTH is.

The SDR-Console sure made it easy to center up on the NOAA sat center.
--
73,
Bob KD7YZ