Date   

Re: Anyone know this SDR

George Smythe
 

Thanks John ...

Used it to find the following:

Original:  https://www.sdrplay.com/rsp1/ (now discontinued)
Upgrade:   https://www.sdrplay.com/rsp1A/ ($117+VAT+$22.78 Courier Shipping


George [KB2GSM]



On Sat, Jun 11, 2022 at 4:27 PM John N5XJL <qra.n5xjl@...> wrote:
Hello, Mike.

This is being sold by numerous dealers on eBay. If you search for this phrase, you'll find lots of listings: "RSP1 Msi2500 Msi001 Scheme Radios Reciver 10kHz-2GHz 12Bit ADC Radios Receiving"

I didn't see any documentation on the first couple of listings I checked out, but maybe that'll be enough information to get you on the trail of something.

John



--
GSM -> George W. Smythe
+1 (631) 780-4476
jethawk@...
------------------------------------------------


Re: Anyone know this SDR

N2MS
 

Zooming in on the pictures it looks like the dip switches set the frequency range and range filters.

Anyone know which software supports this board?

Mike N2MS

On 06/11/2022 3:29 PM John N5XJL <qra.n5xjl@...> wrote:


Hello, Mike.

This is being sold by numerous dealers on eBay. If you search for this phrase, you'll find lots of listings: "RSP1 Msi2500 Msi001 Scheme Radios Reciver 10kHz-2GHz 12Bit ADC Radios Receiving"

I didn't see any documentation on the first couple of listings I checked out, but maybe that'll be enough information to get you on the trail of something.

John


Re: Anyone know this SDR

Siegfried Jackstien
 

I bet you can see it from the printing 



Am 11.06.2022 21:29 schrieb John N5XJL <qra.n5xjl@...>:

Hello, Mike.

This is being sold by numerous dealers on eBay. If you search for this phrase, you'll find lots of listings: "RSP1 Msi2500 Msi001 Scheme Radios Reciver 10kHz-2GHz 12Bit ADC Radios Receiving"

I didn't see any documentation on the first couple of listings I checked out, but maybe that'll be enough information to get you on the trail of something.

John


Re: Anyone know this SDR

John N5XJL
 

Hello, Mike.

This is being sold by numerous dealers on eBay. If you search for this phrase, you'll find lots of listings: "RSP1 Msi2500 Msi001 Scheme Radios Reciver 10kHz-2GHz 12Bit ADC Radios Receiving"

I didn't see any documentation on the first couple of listings I checked out, but maybe that'll be enough information to get you on the trail of something.

John


Re: Anyone know this SDR

George Smythe
 

No ... but I want to!

George [KB2GSM] 

On Sat, Jun 11, 2022, 14:42 Mike <gd6icr@...> wrote:
Need to know the switch settings on this SDR please


Anyone know this SDR

Mike <gd6icr@...>
 

Need to know the switch settings on this SDR please


Re: SDR's For Sale. Maybe Other Equipment, Antenna, ETC.

Andrea Dalbagno
 

Good Evening John

May I ask if you have any news about your Wellbrook?

Thanks in advance

73
Andrea IN3IWZ 

Il gio 2 giu 2022, 21:55 John Bain <johnpbain@...> ha scritto:
Hello Andrea, I am from Glasgow in Scotland so obviously still in the uk. I still have all or most of the original packaging for the wellbrook loop and yes I will be selling it. The model is the ALA1530LN, I think I bought it in 2020 but I am not 100% sure of that. The loop has never been mounted outside and has lived in my loft/attic from I bought it. I paid between £260/£280 pounds for it but I won't be looking to get anywhere near that amount back for it. Because of the size of the loop the shipping will probably be more expensive but I'll adjust the price of the loop for you so that you can hopefully get a good price from me. I have no idea of how much the loops sell for second hand but because I don't really use it my price will probably be cheaper. 
 Simon I think I remember that you were a fan of the wellbrook loops and maybe you could have some idea of what 1 would usually sell for. 
 Andrea I hope to be able to get a price for shipping it out tomorrow and if i can do that I can get back to as soon as I can get a reasonable price for shipping. If I don't get a price tomorrow because of the celebration over here in the uk I will definitely get a price for you as soon as the celebration is over and people are going back to work as normal. 
 Andrea I will do my very best to try and get the loop out to you. 
 Very best wishes and very best regards to all. 
 73 John. 
STAY SAFE AND STAY HEALTHY.

On Thu, 2 Jun 2022 at 19:32, Andrea Dalbagno <andrea.dalbagno@...> wrote:
Hello Charles

We in Europe can't buy Wellbrook antenna from England because of the Brexit: for small enterprises like Wellbrook it would involve a big amount of money an burocracy to continue to sell over Europe after that "unexplicable da**ed thing".
For that reason, and for the well known performances of the ALA, I'm interested when someone sell its.

John, are you still thinking to sell yours?

BRG
73 de Andrea IN3IWZ

Il giorno gio 2 giu 2022 alle ore 20:06 Charles Thatcher <charlesjthatcher@...> ha scritto:
Google "Wellbrook antennas". I live in South Africa and had to import it from the UK. It ariived well packaged perfect shape. Can't do any worthwhile HF listening without it. It's pricey but well worth it.
My advice: Buy it it will improve your HF listening pleasure for many years.
Charles

--
John Bain


Re: How to drive band decoder? Output band data?

Max
 

On Tue, Jun 7, 2022 at 09:26 PM, Simon Brown wrote:
I think it can poll the current frequency; it supports Kenwood CAT. This info is on the link you supplied.
OK Simon thanks for that. A good steer. I will take a more careful look at the info. Not the most technically literate here so sometimes I can't see what I'm actually looking for, or "can't see the wood for the trees" as we say here in the UK (for our non-UK friends!).

73

Max


Re: How to drive band decoder? Output band data?

Simon Brown
 

I think it can poll the current frequency; it supports Kenwood CAT. This info is on the link you supplied.

From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> on behalf of Siegfried Jackstien via groups.io <siegfried.jackstien@...>
Sent: 07 June 2022 21:14
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] How to drive band decoder? Output band data?
 
I did also ask for a band data out...
Easiest would be via usb.. And a user setable truth table
Or serial port and an arduino nano ?!? 
Be it for a hermes and shortwave bands 
Or for a pluto and vhf uhf shf bands
Dg9bfc sigi

Am 07.06.2022 21:12 schrieb Max <radiomax@...>:

I have recently acquired one of these Arduino band decoders to control band switching on a linear amplifier that I have:

https://remoteqth.com/arduino-band-decoder.php

I have a Hermes Lite 2 SDR which, as I understand it, with some modification, is able to send band data in a couple of forms. One method I think it supports is voltage levels for each band and another is serial data. I'm not sure what kind.

However, mine is currently unmodified, and before I go ahead and get the soldering iron out, it occurs to me, would it not be easier if SDRC could send band data somehow by way of a table?

So is there a way to get SDRC to send out band data somehow that could drive the switch I have? I assume others must have linears they wish to switch in this way? Of is it always the norm to send the band data direct from SDR/TX to the linear?

Any ideas gratefully received. I did check the SDR-Radio help pages but don't see anything relevant to this, although I may just have missed it? Maybe the USB relays? But also is there any way to use my Arduino switch?

73

Max


--
- + - + -
Please use https://forum.sdr-radio.com:4499/ when posting questions or problems.


Re: How to drive band decoder? Output band data?

Siegfried Jackstien
 

I did also ask for a band data out...
Easiest would be via usb.. And a user setable truth table
Or serial port and an arduino nano ?!? 
Be it for a hermes and shortwave bands 
Or for a pluto and vhf uhf shf bands
Dg9bfc sigi

Am 07.06.2022 21:12 schrieb Max <radiomax@...>:

I have recently acquired one of these Arduino band decoders to control band switching on a linear amplifier that I have:

https://remoteqth.com/arduino-band-decoder.php

I have a Hermes Lite 2 SDR which, as I understand it, with some modification, is able to send band data in a couple of forms. One method I think it supports is voltage levels for each band and another is serial data. I'm not sure what kind.

However, mine is currently unmodified, and before I go ahead and get the soldering iron out, it occurs to me, would it not be easier if SDRC could send band data somehow by way of a table?

So is there a way to get SDRC to send out band data somehow that could drive the switch I have? I assume others must have linears they wish to switch in this way? Of is it always the norm to send the band data direct from SDR/TX to the linear?

Any ideas gratefully received. I did check the SDR-Radio help pages but don't see anything relevant to this, although I may just have missed it? Maybe the USB relays? But also is there any way to use my Arduino switch?

73

Max


How to drive band decoder? Output band data?

Max
 

I have recently acquired one of these Arduino band decoders to control band switching on a linear amplifier that I have:

https://remoteqth.com/arduino-band-decoder.php

I have a Hermes Lite 2 SDR which, as I understand it, with some modification, is able to send band data in a couple of forms. One method I think it supports is voltage levels for each band and another is serial data. I'm not sure what kind.

However, mine is currently unmodified, and before I go ahead and get the soldering iron out, it occurs to me, would it not be easier if SDRC could send band data somehow by way of a table?

So is there a way to get SDRC to send out band data somehow that could drive the switch I have? I assume others must have linears they wish to switch in this way? Of is it always the norm to send the band data direct from SDR/TX to the linear?

Any ideas gratefully received. I did check the SDR-Radio help pages but don't see anything relevant to this, although I may just have missed it? Maybe the USB relays? But also is there any way to use my Arduino switch?

73

Max


Re: Simon's World Map 1.2.10

Cormac, EI4HQ
 

You Sir, are a legend - thanks so much!


Re: My Computer Drifts!

jdow
 

(Edited for clarity)

Well, you'd have to get the correct oscillator on the motherboard. There are several But, that sort of would be the correct way to do it. It would not be trivial, I suspect.

{O.O}

On 20220606 00:11:17, Siegfried Jackstien wrote:

What about adding a gpsdo or ocxo to the pc main board ? (just kidding a bit)
Greetz sigi dg9bfc 

Am 06.06.2022 06:30 schrieb jdow <jdow@...>:

I figure we've beaten this to death. I propose giving the others here a rest.

I will comment that I have great respect for Linux, the kernel. The desktops that find their wayward ways to Linux machines leave "something" to be desired.

{^_-}

On 20220604 23:55:23, David J Taylor via groups.io wrote:
On 05/06/2022 06:59, jdow wrote:
The delay is not as important as the two way path difference. The delay is
automatically canceled out based on the calculated one way delay. So it should
be single digit ms spot on. That's the point of my quibble. A known or
calculated delay can be removed.

Yes, it's the difference between send (20 Mbps) and receive (200 Mbps) and that
asymmetry which introduces an unknown path delay difference which isn't
accounted for, and hence the offset I noted.  As there will be a difference,
all that NTP does is to use the average.

For low interrupt latency from the serial port control lines - the source of
the PPS signal - even the Raspberry Pi 1 is significantly better under Linux
than a typical Windows PC, at least using standard device drivers.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv






Re: My Computer Drifts!

jdow
 

Well, you'd have to get the correct oscillator. But, that sort of would be the correct way to do it. It would not be trivial, I suspect.

{O.O}

On 20220606 00:11:17, Siegfried Jackstien wrote:

What about adding a gpsdo or ocxo to the pc main board ? (just kidding a bit)
Greetz sigi dg9bfc 

Am 06.06.2022 06:30 schrieb jdow <jdow@...>:

I figure we've beaten this to death. I propose giving the others here a rest.

I will comment that I have great respect for Linux, the kernel. The desktops that find their wayward ways to Linux machines leave "something" to be desired.

{^_-}

On 20220604 23:55:23, David J Taylor via groups.io wrote:
On 05/06/2022 06:59, jdow wrote:
The delay is not as important as the two way path difference. The delay is
automatically canceled out based on the calculated one way delay. So it should
be single digit ms spot on. That's the point of my quibble. A known or
calculated delay can be removed.

Yes, it's the difference between send (20 Mbps) and receive (200 Mbps) and that
asymmetry which introduces an unknown path delay difference which isn't
accounted for, and hence the offset I noted.  As there will be a difference,
all that NTP does is to use the average.

For low interrupt latency from the serial port control lines - the source of
the PPS signal - even the Raspberry Pi 1 is significantly better under Linux
than a typical Windows PC, at least using standard device drivers.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv






Re: My Computer Drifts!

Siegfried Jackstien
 

What about adding a gpsdo or ocxo to the pc main board ? (just kidding a bit)
Greetz sigi dg9bfc 

Am 06.06.2022 06:30 schrieb jdow <jdow@...>:

I figure we've beaten this to death. I propose giving the others here a rest.

I will comment that I have great respect for Linux, the kernel. The desktops that find their wayward ways to Linux machines leave "something" to be desired.

{^_-}

On 20220604 23:55:23, David J Taylor via groups.io wrote:
On 05/06/2022 06:59, jdow wrote:
The delay is not as important as the two way path difference. The delay is
automatically canceled out based on the calculated one way delay. So it should
be single digit ms spot on. That's the point of my quibble. A known or
calculated delay can be removed.

Yes, it's the difference between send (20 Mbps) and receive (200 Mbps) and that
asymmetry which introduces an unknown path delay difference which isn't
accounted for, and hence the offset I noted.  As there will be a difference,
all that NTP does is to use the average.

For low interrupt latency from the serial port control lines - the source of
the PPS signal - even the Raspberry Pi 1 is significantly better under Linux
than a typical Windows PC, at least using standard device drivers.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv






Re: My Computer Drifts!

jdow
 

I figure we've beaten this to death. I propose giving the others here a rest.

I will comment that I have great respect for Linux, the kernel. The desktops that find their wayward ways to Linux machines leave "something" to be desired.

{^_-}

On 20220604 23:55:23, David J Taylor via groups.io wrote:

On 05/06/2022 06:59, jdow wrote:
The delay is not as important as the two way path difference. The delay is
automatically canceled out based on the calculated one way delay. So it should
be single digit ms spot on. That's the point of my quibble. A known or
calculated delay can be removed.

Yes, it's the difference between send (20 Mbps) and receive (200 Mbps) and that
asymmetry which introduces an unknown path delay difference which isn't
accounted for, and hence the offset I noted.  As there will be a difference,
all that NTP does is to use the average.

For low interrupt latency from the serial port control lines - the source of
the PPS signal - even the Raspberry Pi 1 is significantly better under Linux
than a typical Windows PC, at least using standard device drivers.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv





Re: My Computer Drifts!

David J Taylor
 

On 05/06/2022 06:59, jdow wrote:
The delay is not as important as the two way path difference. The delay is
automatically canceled out based on the calculated one way delay. So it should
be single digit ms spot on. That's the point of my quibble. A known or
calculated delay can be removed.
Yes, it's the difference between send (20 Mbps) and receive (200 Mbps) and that
asymmetry which introduces an unknown path delay difference which isn't
accounted for, and hence the offset I noted. As there will be a difference,
all that NTP does is to use the average.

For low interrupt latency from the serial port control lines - the source of
the PPS signal - even the Raspberry Pi 1 is significantly better under Linux
than a typical Windows PC, at least using standard device drivers.

Cheers,
David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv


Re: My Computer Drifts!

jdow
 

On 20220604 22:30:59, David J Taylor via groups.io wrote:
On 04/06/2022 20:03, jdow wrote:
My configuration here involves a Linux router that does a lot of other work and
a largish set of PCs around the house, mostly here in the computer room. They
range from PLCs to a rather hypertrophied gaming machine use for multiple VMs,
development, and the like. (Visual Studio is THE preeminent game in the known
universe.)

When speaking of accuracy you have to deal with a pot load of different entry
points for errors. The ones NTP monitors and considers in its design are delay,
offset, and jitter. NTP, as embodied in the canonical Univ of U of Delaware
version as amended up to date, measures the path delay in such a way as to get
a reasonable estimate of path delays to multiple sources. The path to and the
path from the server may be slightly different. You can see that in the offset
value. NTP makes a best estimate for time and publishes the time offsets. It
also passes this information along to the consumers. Offset here varies from
-5.3ms to 5.9ms. The chosen clock and the secondary are coming in at + and - 2
ms. The chosen clock is .NIST.. The secondary clock is .GPS. I could setup a
pure GPS configuration here if I hooked up the PPS from my Trimble to the
router. But, it's not broke so I don't fix it. The final figure, jitter, gives
a good estimate of the link quality between the consumer and the hosts. The two
good ones are coming in at under 6 ms of jitter. All these numbers vary with
time of day. For my current needs this is good enough. If I needed better I'd
have to go to a formal PPS hookup. (None of the USB crap, either. They do look
like fun to play with, though.)

For my main PC I am using a very old tool I have had for a long time. Mr.
Horsley created an open sores partial implementation of ntp that I use to tweak
my PC's clock in 1ms steps - since at least early XP days through today. I have
it logging clock corrections. Most are 0 ms with the occasional 1ms correction.
I ran Symmetricom's ntp for awhile. But I went back to Tom's tool. It ain't
broke and I have a much older view on the urgency to make perfect than I used
to have.

(I am one of the persons responsible for the GPS phase 2B satellite segment's
extremely accurate intentional inaccuracy for whatever worth that may be.)

If ntp accuracy is insufficient at least one more protocol exists that refines
to microseconds or finer. It is/was used by radio astronomers to get them in
the ballpark.

{^_^}

Certainly tying the PPS into the router would increase performance.  Typically
here I see up to 02 ms jitter from the internal servers, and under 2 ms from
the pool servers (UK).  They all show an offset of 2-3 ms, but this with a
cable modem link that's 200 Mbps down, 20 Mbps up, hence gross asymmetry.

During the development of Windows NTP (by Dave Hart) I used to monitor much
more that I do now.  The offset graphs are enough.

As you know, reference NTP alters the click rate rather than stepping the
clock.  Since Windows 8.1 NTP uses the more accurate time instructions which
are in 100 nanosecond units, and this has improved things a lot.

Thanks for contributing to the Selective Availability work - perhaps one of the
factors which led to the Galileo constellation which has meant more satellites
for everyone!

I never mentioned that potential to the AF guy. But, then, that was way off in the future when he was only a little way off in the future with his thinking. Col. Parkinson was a different story. I still hold that grudge. I suggested some techniques for the prelaunch test and calibration receiver that he and his consultants decided were not suitable. Then when the contract for the next test receivers came out those consultants used my ideas to compete against my company, Rockwell at the time. That seemed REALLY unethical to me.

The precision timer use has me vaguely inclined to use the latest ntp toy since I suspect it can diddle that clock timer to increase potential accuracy tremendously - if I can get the PPS interrupt working without (huge) delays. (with huge in terms of nanoseconds.) But my platter has a bunch of other stuff first. Phase tracking signals on HF at night has some potential to be interesting for propagation calculations.)

{^_-}


Re: My Computer Drifts!

jdow
 

On 20220604 22:08:59, David J Taylor via groups.io wrote:
On 04/06/2022 20:21, jdow wrote:
Um, just a quibble here, the three pool entries I also use are never chosen as the reference. Of necessity one of them is always one of the candidates. But, then, I am a very modest number of hops from the .NIST. and .GPS. servers on the list. Pool servers almost always have much larger delay times. NIST is 46 ms. The best pool entry I have is 83 ms and the worst is about 120 ms. So NIST is not particularly bad to use. The other one is a local large university's engineering department.

{^_^}

That's just what I mean by well-configured.  You can adjust things to suit your own local requirements.  My chosen server is always one of my own stratum-1 servers.  My UK or NL pool servers are typically between 19 and 43 ms away, perhaps you might do better by US state rather than just US?

For most folk, just using the local pool servers will be fine.

Cheers,
David

The delay is not as important as the two way path difference. The delay is automatically canceled out based on the calculated one way delay. So it should be single digit ms spot on. That's the point of my quibble. A known or calculated delay can be removed.

There is an irony here. The NTP protocol can adjust clock divisors up and down, generally one count when it's a stable environment. So it's nominally up to a half a divisor step off moving up and down with a very accurate average. That, at a very small level, is precisely what the synthesizer in the satellites is doing. On Phase 2B the core is a DDS built with early TTL logic. Nothing "good" or "modern" was allowed due to the gold doping used. Gold had to be removed from the packages to make the radiation hardening requirements - roughly a nuke explosion a few miles away from the satellite.

That wandering effect should enter into your error bar calculations. The PC's error bar contribution will be much larger than the satellite with its roughly 0.2 ppt synthesizer step which is its second level of wander. The other level of wander is/was classified so.... So was the ultimate step but it's in the noise so knowing it's no big help to anybody. (And the AF captain supervising the projects REALLY did not want to discuss differential GPS when discussing planting a bomb in Jimmy Carter's personal White House potty. That mooted most of the work I did except that it could provide VERY precise signals to work with, well beyond the original standards.

{^_-}


Re: My Computer Drifts!

David J Taylor
 

In the previous, swap 02 ms for 0.2 ms, and click rate for clock rate!
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv

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