Date   

Re: A new way to shut off a PC

michel soldevila
 

Ordered today a new 650W Cordsair PSU ... and thermal grease.
Michel, F1GOC


Re: A new way to shut off a PC

Allan Isaacs
 

Your problem with the Seasonic was probably aging capacitors Max.

Lifetime of electolytics is an inverse function of temperature and some specific makes were very poor.

A PC PSU is basically always ticking over when powered up waiting for the trigger from the on off button.

When the button is pressed there’s an instantaneous check for current drain which if deemed excessive will prevent the DC voltages establishing. If a bad capacitor is present things will go awry with normal current deemed too high probably because proper voltages are not being established.

If you open the bad PSU case you would most likely see one or more capacitors with a bulging top.

The same problem capacitors plagued motherboards ten years ago.

Allan G3PIY


From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io [mailto:main@SDR-Radio.groups.io] On Behalf Of Max
Sent: 22 December 2021 22:35
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] A new way to shut off a PC

 

Agree power supply can caused weird faults. I had one where the PC could not be turned on with the front panel switch, but would turn on if the main AC outlet switch was cycled. Friend had same PSU (Seasonic) they no longer needed, but was identical model and age as we had got a deal by company to build our two PCs at same time to same spec, so he sent that to me. Tried that. Exactly same fault, so assumed PSU not at fault but then PC decided not to turn on at all. Changed motherboard, same fault again. As a last resort I bought a brand new PSU (Corsair). Turned on, all sorted. Incredibly, friend's PSU they had lent me must have had exactly the same fault on it. What's the chance of that?!

Had the new Corsair PSU now for maybe three years. No issues whatsoever. Possibly illogical, but will probably avoid Seasonic PSU again in future!

Max

_._,_._,_

 


Re: A new way to shut off a PC

Max
 

Agree power supply can caused weird faults. I had one where the PC could not be turned on with the front panel switch, but would turn on if the main AC outlet switch was cycled. Friend had same PSU (Seasonic) they no longer needed, but was identical model and age as we had got a deal by company to build our two PCs at same time to same spec, so he sent that to me. Tried that. Exactly same fault, so assumed PSU not at fault but then PC decided not to turn on at all. Changed motherboard, same fault again. As a last resort I bought a brand new PSU (Corsair). Turned on, all sorted. Incredibly, friend's PSU they had lent me must have had exactly the same fault on it. What's the chance of that?!

Had the new Corsair PSU now for maybe three years. No issues whatsoever. Possibly illogical, but will probably avoid Seasonic PSU again in future!

Max


Re: A new way to shut off a PC

michel soldevila
 

Hi Ken,
Everything in the PC has been cleaned, each fan checked or replaced when necessary.
Michel


Re: A new way to shut off a PC

Ken Sejkora
 

Hi Michel,

 

Does the video card have a fan on the GPU?  If so, cleaning the blades and cooling fins of dust might help.  I had a video card in an old PC several years ago that was so clogged with dust that the fan wouldn’t even rotate.  Even after removing the dust, the fan still wouldn’t turn, and I had to replace the fan.  You might want to pull the video card out, blow all the dust out, wipe the blade contacts with isopropyl alcohol, and insert+remove the card into the slot a few times to exercise the contacts.

 

While you are at it, it might be worth blowing the dust out of the power supply as well.  Every 6 to 8 months I open the PC case, and use a vacuum cleaner with the hose connected to the exhaust, and blow all the dust out of the case, off the CPU, off the GPU, off the various cooling fans, out of the power supply, etc.  It is surprising how much dust creeps in when running the PC 24/7.

 

Good Luck.

 

Ken

 

From: michel soldevila
Sent: Wednesday, December 22, 2021 03:18 PM
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] A new way to shut off a PC

 

We are almost there !
Without the graphics card, the PC no longer switches off when SDR Console is launched.
SDR Console is thus totally cleared. My mistake.
So, two possibilities remain: the aging power supply, or the Nvidia Quadro 2000 graphics card. I will tend to charge the power supply first. 
What do you think ?
Michel, F1GOC

 


NDB - Airspy HF+ DIscovery versus Hermes Lite 2

Max
 

For anyone interested. 132ft end fed antenna. 20:26 in evening. NDB is CHT (Chilterns) 277 kHz at 61 miles NE from my home QTH. As you can see I've isolated the CW sideband but that's irrelevant as the difference can clearly be seen in the waterfall. 

Airspy

HL2

Connected in turn to the two receivers, but conditions were very stable and results repeatable.

To my great surprise (because I was expecting superior performance from Airspy at this low frequency, which is why I bought it) HL2 bests the HF+ by some way.

I intend to repeat experiment tomorrow and next day on the Grimeton Christmas transmissions on 17.2 kHz. In theory the HF+ should be superior there at least. We shall see.

https://alexander.n.se/en/saq-scheduled-for-a-transmission-on-christmas-eve-december-24th/

73

Max


Re: A new way to shut off a PC

michel soldevila
 

We are almost there !
Without the graphics card, the PC no longer switches off when SDR Console is launched.
SDR Console is thus totally cleared. My mistake.
So, two possibilities remain: the aging power supply, or the Nvidia Quadro 2000 graphics card. I will tend to charge the power supply first. 
What do you think ?
Michel, F1GOC


Re: 137MHz "V" Antenna advice needed ...

Siegfried Jackstien
 

I made a qfh from a wodden support and 2 stiff wires bent into qfh shape
Easy to build
Hidden in a tree so xyl friendly :-)
I have to check what size i used.. But what i sure do remember.. I first built it for 137 but made it smaller for better performance on the weaker ham sats
Noaa birds on 137 are so strong that you can live with some mismatch
Dg9bfc sigi 

Am 22.12.2021 17:57 schrieb Chris <Deach01ca@...>:

Every ground plane I’ve ever seen has been connected to.. a ground!

The “active” part of the 1/4 wave is usually connected to the center conductor of the coax, the ground plane is connected to the shield and all ground planes are connected together.
That picture is a very wierd combination of a half wave horizontal V dipole and a ground plane. It “may” work but I have my doubts about whether it’s worth the effort as a simple V dipole works quite well.

It doesn’t take much to grab the vhf NOAA sats. I’ve done it with everything from a rubber ducky to a 250 foot long wire.

let’s think of the antenna requirements for low earth orbit. The following assume “normal” reception, not using  specialized (and far more expensive) equipment to squeeze the last second out of each pass.
1) It must be omnidirectional, hear equally well from all directions, because we don’t want to have to aim the antenna at the satellite and track it during each pass.
2) it should have best gain toward horizons and can have less gain directly overhand. The satellite is furthest away and there’s more atmosphere to absorb the signal when the satellite is lower in the sky. Overhead, it’s closer.
3) It should be able to receive both horizontal and vertical polarization. As the satellite passes, the angle of its antenna in relation to the angle of the receive antenna will change.
4) Gain isnt as important as a good “view” to the horizon in all directions. Gain won’t make up for being in the shadow of an object.

in order of complexity, here’s the three common antennas that meet the criteria.

a straight “V” antenna with one element connected to the center conductor and the other to the shield of the coax works quite well as a novice antenna.
pros: really easy to make. Decent performance, moderately omnidirectional in both vertical and horizontal planes, 
cons: changing polarization will cause brief sharp nulls during some phases.

a common vertical ground plane.
pros: can be made out of a panel mount “UHF” connector and a metal coat hanger, completely omnidirectional in the horizontal plane, null directly overhead in vertical plane, pretty good toward the horizon.
Cons: polarization is vertical, expect brief deep nulls as polarization shifts.

a “turnstyle” antenna which is basically two horizontal dipoles as right angles to each other.
pros: omnidirectional, slightly better performance than V dipole
cons: can be difficult to tune and match, changing polarization will cause brief sharp nulls during some phases.

a QFH antenna.
pros: omnidirectional on horizontal and vertical directions, polarization issues are minimal.
cons: mechanically complex, larger, ugly (according to my wife).

The antenna that’s being proposed violates requirement number 2. The ground plane, if configured correctly) will tend to boost signals overhead at the expense of weaker signals toward the horizon. At best, playing with spacing and lengths it could be forced to have a ‘lobe’ toward the horizon, but it would have dead spots as the vertical angle changes. Not a desirable situation for this type of reception. It’s a very strange he hybrid of a V and a ground plane. As a V is normally a dipole with both elements driven, it’s hard to see what the connection to the ground plane should be.

If your starting out, keep it simple, get the antenna outdoors with as large a view of the sky as possible. You will be surprised at how good the pictures are.
if you decide to get serious about this mode, I would jump straight to a QFH and not mess about with small signal improvements for lots of work.

Don’t get bent out of shape about “proper” coax. Normal, inexpensive, cable/satellite TV RG6 is just fine in most situations. Same with “LNA’s”. Unless you have a hearing impaired receiver, you should see pictures without and if you do have a deaf receiver, your better off saving your money and put it toward something decent.



Re: 137MHz "V" Antenna advice needed ...

Chris
 

Every ground plane I’ve ever seen has been connected to.. a ground!

The “active” part of the 1/4 wave is usually connected to the center conductor of the coax, the ground plane is connected to the shield and all ground planes are connected together.
That picture is a very wierd combination of a half wave horizontal V dipole and a ground plane. It “may” work but I have my doubts about whether it’s worth the effort as a simple V dipole works quite well.

It doesn’t take much to grab the vhf NOAA sats. I’ve done it with everything from a rubber ducky to a 250 foot long wire.

let’s think of the antenna requirements for low earth orbit. The following assume “normal” reception, not using  specialized (and far more expensive) equipment to squeeze the last second out of each pass.
1) It must be omnidirectional, hear equally well from all directions, because we don’t want to have to aim the antenna at the satellite and track it during each pass.
2) it should have best gain toward horizons and can have less gain directly overhand. The satellite is furthest away and there’s more atmosphere to absorb the signal when the satellite is lower in the sky. Overhead, it’s closer.
3) It should be able to receive both horizontal and vertical polarization. As the satellite passes, the angle of its antenna in relation to the angle of the receive antenna will change.
4) Gain isnt as important as a good “view” to the horizon in all directions. Gain won’t make up for being in the shadow of an object.

in order of complexity, here’s the three common antennas that meet the criteria.

a straight “V” antenna with one element connected to the center conductor and the other to the shield of the coax works quite well as a novice antenna.
pros: really easy to make. Decent performance, moderately omnidirectional in both vertical and horizontal planes, 
cons: changing polarization will cause brief sharp nulls during some phases.

a common vertical ground plane.
pros: can be made out of a panel mount “UHF” connector and a metal coat hanger, completely omnidirectional in the horizontal plane, null directly overhead in vertical plane, pretty good toward the horizon.
Cons: polarization is vertical, expect brief deep nulls as polarization shifts.

a “turnstyle” antenna which is basically two horizontal dipoles as right angles to each other.
pros: omnidirectional, slightly better performance than V dipole
cons: can be difficult to tune and match, changing polarization will cause brief sharp nulls during some phases.

a QFH antenna.
pros: omnidirectional on horizontal and vertical directions, polarization issues are minimal.
cons: mechanically complex, larger, ugly (according to my wife).

The antenna that’s being proposed violates requirement number 2. The ground plane, if configured correctly) will tend to boost signals overhead at the expense of weaker signals toward the horizon. At best, playing with spacing and lengths it could be forced to have a ‘lobe’ toward the horizon, but it would have dead spots as the vertical angle changes. Not a desirable situation for this type of reception. It’s a very strange he hybrid of a V and a ground plane. As a V is normally a dipole with both elements driven, it’s hard to see what the connection to the ground plane should be.

If your starting out, keep it simple, get the antenna outdoors with as large a view of the sky as possible. You will be surprised at how good the pictures are.
if you decide to get serious about this mode, I would jump straight to a QFH and not mess about with small signal improvements for lots of work.

Don’t get bent out of shape about “proper” coax. Normal, inexpensive, cable/satellite TV RG6 is just fine in most situations. Same with “LNA’s”. Unless you have a hearing impaired receiver, you should see pictures without and if you do have a deaf receiver, your better off saving your money and put it toward something decent.


Re: A new way to shut off a PC

michel soldevila
 

Yep, Simon, HardwareMonitor is already installed. No temperature problem reported.
I refined the tests:
- running SDR Console without any SDR connected: OK
- connecting the SDR to the PC: OK
- starting SDR Console: crash !
I strongly suspect the PSU, like Dennis. I will therefore do the test recommended by Allan: unplug the graphics card to reduce the load on the power supply.
A suivre !
Michel, F1GOC


Re: 137MHz "V" Antenna advice needed ...

David Slipper
 

That makes sense ... many thanks.

I have a box full of 750mm telescopic aerials so this was a very cheap starting point ;-)

Dave


On 22/12/2021 13:50, D R via groups.io wrote:

A lot of Daves on here giving advice!

The reflectors on the illustrated V antenna are simply forming a ground plane, and they should NOT be connected to the feedline.  Ideally, they should be connected to each other where they cross, or at least make each pair of opposites from a single length of wire/rod/tube.  Some experimentation with the distance between the V and the ground plane may be necessary, as this will affect the sensitivity at low elevations (with a standard turnstile antenna the best spacing is around 3/8 wavelength, but it may be different with a V).

As David Taylor says, a QFH antenna is the preferred modern antenna for WxSat reception, but if you are just starting out the V will be a lot simpler to make, and you can trade up later.  Have fun!

Regards,
Dave


Re: 137MHz "V" Antenna advice needed ...

D R
 

A lot of Daves on here giving advice!

The reflectors on the illustrated V antenna are simply forming a ground plane, and they should NOT be connected to the feedline.  Ideally, they should be connected to each other where they cross, or at least make each pair of opposites from a single length of wire/rod/tube.  Some experimentation with the distance between the V and the ground plane may be necessary, as this will affect the sensitivity at low elevations (with a standard turnstile antenna the best spacing is around 3/8 wavelength, but it may be different with a V).

As David Taylor says, a QFH antenna is the preferred modern antenna for WxSat reception, but if you are just starting out the V will be a lot simpler to make, and you can trade up later.  Have fun!

Regards,
Dave


Re: 137MHz "V" Antenna advice needed ...

Larry Horlick
 

That only works in a Holiday Inn Express. A regular Holiday Inn won't do it...

Larry

On Wed, Dec 22, 2021 at 12:14 AM Kriss Kliegle KA1GJU <kliegle@...> wrote:
Connected... Yes
Grounded... Yes (coax shield)

Satellites reception

But I'm currently in a Hilton, not a Holiday Inn... so I am not a rocket scientist yet, but maybe on the next trip?


73 Kriss KA1GJU/AM


Re: 137MHz "V" Antenna advice needed ...

David J Taylor
 

On 22/12/2021 03:04, David Slipper wrote:
It's NOT a Yagi - this picture (see HERE
<https://www.amsat.se/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/V-dipole_ritning.jpg>)
is similar to what I am building but for 137MHz (the one in the pic is for a
higher frequency).

The two dipole elements are horizontal and 120 degrees apart.

Do the reflector elements need to be connected together??

Do they need grounding ?? or connecting to the feed in some way ??

Dave
Dave,

If you are going to build something the QFH antenna would be a better choice
for APT/LRPT 137 MHz reception, for example:

https://www.satsignal.eu/wxsat/equipment.htm

but search for more recent links.

David
--
SatSignal Software - Quality software for you
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu
Email: david-taylor@...
Twitter: @gm8arv


Re: A new way to shut off a PC

Simon Brown
 

FWIW: https://openhardwaremonitor.org/ is a great program for tracking temperature.

 

Simon Brown, G4ELI

https://www.sdr-radio.com

 

From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of jdow
Sent: 22 December 2021 02:01
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] A new way to shut off a PC

 

So what is the CPU temperature.
{^_^}

On 20211221 07:06:49, michel soldevila wrote:

The disks are in good conditions according to CrystalDiskInfo. The resync only happens when the PC suffers an unexpected shutdown. As pointed out by Allan, this is normal opération.

Come to think of it, this problem arose quite recently (before switching from Windows 7 to  Windows 10) and has evolved rapidly. Initially, the PC did not stop with each launch of SDR Console, as is the case today.
This could favor the thermal failure hypothesis. However, Speccy returns normal temperatures: 40 ° C for the discs, 58°C for the graphic card,  25°C inside the PC box.

Fortunately, I have my laptop to continue listening to shortwave while investigating this issue!
Michel, F1GOC

 


--
- + - + -
Please use https://forum.sdr-radio.com:4499/ when posting questions or problems.


Re: 137MHz "V" Antenna advice needed ...

Kriss Kliegle KA1GJU
 

Connected... Yes
Grounded... Yes (coax shield)

Satellites reception

But I'm currently in a Hilton, not a Holiday Inn... so I am not a rocket scientist yet, but maybe on the next trip?


73 Kriss KA1GJU/AM


Re: 137MHz "V" Antenna advice needed ...

Michael Durkin
 

DiskCone is what I see ... 


On Tue, Dec 21, 2021, 7:04 PM David Slipper <softfoot@...> wrote:

It's NOT a Yagi - this picture (see HERE)  is similar to what I am building but for 137MHz (the one in the pic is for a higher frequency).

The two dipole elements are horizontal and 120 degrees apart.

Do the reflector elements need to be connected together??

Do they need grounding ?? or connecting to the feed in some way ??

Dave



On 21/12/2021 23:30, Kriss Kliegle KA1GJU wrote:

Slightly confused... any images of said 8 element horizontal V dipole?
With that said...
A beam (Yagi) with 8 elements will be highly directional, not something you want when chasing a satellite that is moving across the sky... unless you plan on using an azimuth/elevation rotator (more complexity).
I know one satellite operator in the club uses the 'egg beater' type antennas, they're omnidirectional  and no there are no moving parts to fail.

Typically in a beam antenna, the elements are +/- 1/2 wave long (two +/- 1/4 wave elements connected together to form one +/- 1/2 wavelength long element). Since the center of each parasitic element (essentially a dipole) is at 0 volts, the element is usually clamped to a metal boom without being insulated.
Lots of info on the web to get dimensions of each element and the spacing (google "VHF beam antenna dimensions" or similar)

i.e: https://www.rfwireless-world.com/calculators/3-element-Yagi-Antenna-Calculator.html
Yagi Antenna calculator Formula
Yagi beam antennas are great for narrowing the 'field of view' of RF, but once not aimed within the beam width, the RX'ed signal can drop off dramatically.
Antenna specs of commercially available antennas will state what the half-power beam width is. For example a -3dB drop or half power drop from the main lobe:

Antenna Beamwidth

The more elements added, the more forward gain (better front to back ratio)... at a cost of a more narrow beam width. Of course there are lots of variables that can be tweaked, height above ground, element spacing, element lengths, etc to change the specs of a beam.

Confused yet?

73 Kriss KA1GJU/AM


Re: 137MHz "V" Antenna advice needed ...

jdow
 

I am making educated guesses here.

Yes, connect them together to the shield of the feed line. I am not sure what you are trying to achieve here, though.

{^_^}

On 20211221 19:04:08, David Slipper wrote:

It's NOT a Yagi - this picture (see HERE)  is similar to what I am building but for 137MHz (the one in the pic is for a higher frequency).

The two dipole elements are horizontal and 120 degrees apart.

Do the reflector elements need to be connected together??

Do they need grounding ?? or connecting to the feed in some way ??

Dave



On 21/12/2021 23:30, Kriss Kliegle KA1GJU wrote:

Slightly confused... any images of said 8 element horizontal V dipole?
With that said...
A beam (Yagi) with 8 elements will be highly directional, not something you want when chasing a satellite that is moving across the sky... unless you plan on using an azimuth/elevation rotator (more complexity).
I know one satellite operator in the club uses the 'egg beater' type antennas, they're omnidirectional  and no there are no moving parts to fail.

Typically in a beam antenna, the elements are +/- 1/2 wave long (two +/- 1/4 wave elements connected together to form one +/- 1/2 wavelength long element). Since the center of each parasitic element (essentially a dipole) is at 0 volts, the element is usually clamped to a metal boom without being insulated.
Lots of info on the web to get dimensions of each element and the spacing (google "VHF beam antenna dimensions" or similar)

i.e: https://www.rfwireless-world.com/calculators/3-element-Yagi-Antenna-Calculator.html
Yagi Antenna calculator Formula
Yagi beam antennas are great for narrowing the 'field of view' of RF, but once not aimed within the beam width, the RX'ed signal can drop off dramatically.
Antenna specs of commercially available antennas will state what the half-power beam width is. For example a -3dB drop or half power drop from the main lobe:

Antenna Beamwidth

The more elements added, the more forward gain (better front to back ratio)... at a cost of a more narrow beam width. Of course there are lots of variables that can be tweaked, height above ground, element spacing, element lengths, etc to change the specs of a beam.

Confused yet?

73 Kriss KA1GJU/AM


Re: 137MHz "V" Antenna advice needed ...

David Slipper
 

It's NOT a Yagi - this picture (see HERE)  is similar to what I am building but for 137MHz (the one in the pic is for a higher frequency).

The two dipole elements are horizontal and 120 degrees apart.

Do the reflector elements need to be connected together??

Do they need grounding ?? or connecting to the feed in some way ??

Dave



On 21/12/2021 23:30, Kriss Kliegle KA1GJU wrote:

Slightly confused... any images of said 8 element horizontal V dipole?
With that said...
A beam (Yagi) with 8 elements will be highly directional, not something you want when chasing a satellite that is moving across the sky... unless you plan on using an azimuth/elevation rotator (more complexity).
I know one satellite operator in the club uses the 'egg beater' type antennas, they're omnidirectional  and no there are no moving parts to fail.

Typically in a beam antenna, the elements are +/- 1/2 wave long (two +/- 1/4 wave elements connected together to form one +/- 1/2 wavelength long element). Since the center of each parasitic element (essentially a dipole) is at 0 volts, the element is usually clamped to a metal boom without being insulated.
Lots of info on the web to get dimensions of each element and the spacing (google "VHF beam antenna dimensions" or similar)

i.e: https://www.rfwireless-world.com/calculators/3-element-Yagi-Antenna-Calculator.html
Yagi Antenna calculator Formula
Yagi beam antennas are great for narrowing the 'field of view' of RF, but once not aimed within the beam width, the RX'ed signal can drop off dramatically.
Antenna specs of commercially available antennas will state what the half-power beam width is. For example a -3dB drop or half power drop from the main lobe:

Antenna Beamwidth

The more elements added, the more forward gain (better front to back ratio)... at a cost of a more narrow beam width. Of course there are lots of variables that can be tweaked, height above ground, element spacing, element lengths, etc to change the specs of a beam.

Confused yet?

73 Kriss KA1GJU/AM


Re: A new way to shut off a PC

jdow
 

So what is the CPU temperature.
{^_^}

On 20211221 07:06:49, michel soldevila wrote:

The disks are in good conditions according to CrystalDiskInfo. The resync only happens when the PC suffers an unexpected shutdown. As pointed out by Allan, this is normal opération.

Come to think of it, this problem arose quite recently (before switching from Windows 7 to  Windows 10) and has evolved rapidly. Initially, the PC did not stop with each launch of SDR Console, as is the case today.
This could favor the thermal failure hypothesis. However, Speccy returns normal temperatures: 40 ° C for the discs, 58°C for the graphic card,  25°C inside the PC box.
Fortunately, I have my laptop to continue listening to shortwave while investigating this issue!
Michel, F1GOC

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