Date   

Re: FM Stereo DXing - Polarisation?

Leif Asbrink
 

Hi Jose,

Indeed it is difficult with different languages.
I can read your long text, but you use "polarization"
in an undefined way that is unacceptable!

You have to be more verbose. There are two cases:

1) An antenna receiving an incoming wave of
a specific polarization.

2) An antenna receiving a signal transmitted
from an antenna with a specific polarization.

Please rewrite the posting you made explicitly stating
which of the above cases you talk about. They of course
differ by the effects of the path and any possible
phenomenon that could alter polarization (reflection
and/or Faraday rotation)

I think that you will find that your statements below
sometimes refer to case 1 and sometimes to case 2. This
is confusing and misleading. When you specify in each
case what you refer to with the word "polarization" I
think you will write something that I find correct.
The below text is not because it mixes case 1 and 2 in
a non-transparent way.

Regards

Leif







On Fri, 12 Apr 2019 12:55:34 +0200
"jose maria trueba" <josemariatrueba@...> wrote:

Leif,

Many times is difficult to put in words ideas, specially when writting in a
foreign language. I tend to write the same idea with different sentences in
order to avoid confussions but even so miss-interpretations are still
possible like this time.

Let me try again.

Maxwell works are VERY difficult to understand. Their three famous vectors
and formulae are well known but concepts are VERY complex.
Receiving with circular polarization any linear polarization transmission
at any E plane, normally either vertical or horizontal but at any other
angle too, makes us loose exactly 3dB respect to the signal strength that
we receive with the same antenna in linear configuration perfectly aligned
to the received E plane.

Isolation of orthogonal polarizations are at most around 20dB in cross
dipoles, although many times we see lower numbers and some very good
designs can get higher numbers. A perfect antenna would loose an infinite
number of dB, in practice decent antennas can only get a 20dB polariation
isolation or so. But it always are much higher than 3dB.

That is why using circular is good because we loose only 3dB, exactly
three, and we can forget which angle the linear polarizated wave had been
transmittes and at what angle is arriving to our antenna. We can measure
the signal strength arriving at our locations simply adding 3dB.

Using a 45° skewed linear polarization antenna to receive vertical or
horizontal does not result in a 20dB loss or more, nor 3dB loss, nor 0dB
loss, but in unknown number of dB loss. It depends on how imperfect our
antennas are. It is not a good idea. Simple, easy, but no good. We do loose
exactly 3dB when receiving circular, but we do not loose exactly 3dB when
receiving with a 45° skewed linear.

When a radio wave hits a perfect reflector the transmitted polarization
suffers a 90° change, as seen in common satellites parabolic reflectors. We
set a vertical dipole at the focus to receive horizontal polarizartion and
a vertical dipole for horizontal. A ccw circular for cw, and a cw for ccw,
if using circular polarization against a perfect reflector because it acts
same as a mirror.

Reflections, refractions in the propagation paths delays produced by
multipath and polarization distirtions do appear althoug they are nor a
perfect mirror. Circular antennas behave better for multipath problems.
Besides creating multipath, ionizated air layers are not good mirrors but
they do affect polarization somehow.

But when reflections are not that good, angle changes in polarization are
random, in practice impossible to predict, although we could move a linear
antenna to obtain a minimum signal strength see obtained angle and add 90°
to calculate the exact angle.

Similar but different is what we do when aligning skew in a sat dish. But
in this case there are no polarization change due to reflections but due to
our location respect ro the satellite location after some espheric
trigonometric calculations.

Mountains in my area create big problems. Moving an antenna small distance
have strong effects. This is why is good to have two or more antennas in
phase rather than a bigger single one.
Space diversity is welcome.

I have a pair of 4.5m long LFAs separated 3m side by side, to get some
space diversity having two phased beams instead one twice as long of the
same total antenna gain. I can null local noise, and even null a repeater
when working another one i n the same frequency.They are excellent.

As Michael just wrote...All this is very interesting, no doubt.



Running SDRconsole under Win10

Barry Chambers
 

I have been running SDRConsole 3.06 on my Win 7 laptop with a SDRPlay RSP2 and it works well so I decided to install it on my Win10 laptop. The installation went OK but I cannot get the software to start after selecting my  RSP2..

I have save the diagnostics file but how do I attach this?


Re: FM Stereo DXing - Polarisation?

Jim Smith G0OFE
 

A tilted Es cloud will change the polarisation at the recieving end. I have personal experience of this where a 2m vertical was recieving a station on band 2, nothing with the horizontal beam. The signal was listed as horizontally polarised.

================================
Jim, Bournemouth, Dorset. IO90BR.
Elad FDM-S2, Airspy HF+, SDRPlay and Funcube Dongle SDR Recievers
8-element OP-DES for Band 2, 8-element LFA for 2m, 3-element LFA for 6m, 20m Windom for HF,. Wellbrook 1530 Loop for LF


On 12/04/2019 16:25, jose maria trueba wrote:
A friend told me that reflections do change left hand circular into right hand and the other way around, but not vertical into horizontal. Sorry!



Enviado desde Samsung tablet

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Re: FM Stereo DXing - Polarisation?

jose maria trueba
 

A friend told me that reflections do change left hand circular into right hand and the other way around, but not vertical into horizontal. Sorry!



Enviado desde Samsung tablet


Re: SDR-Server v3 stuttering on laptop PCs #sdrconsolev3 #airspyhfplus #sdrplay

Kriss Kliegle KA1GJU
 

Thank you for all your efforts and posting here as to what works and what doesn't!

My home network is getting rather complicated, but users from outside world have no issues. But when I access my own gear from within my LAN, using Desktop A (in the house) or Desktop B (in the barn) I get stuttering ONLY on the SDR-iq's. It can be reduced by opening a browser and INCREASING the load on the networkThe SDRPlay's work fine, all the way up to 1MHz bandwidth! Where the SDR-iq still chokes at 30 kHz bandwidth. Switches are all 10/100Mbs. Servers are all little Atom processor netbooks, with the exception of the I3 laptop, because the Airspy HF+ wouldn't work as a server on any of the netbooks as a server. Like you, I'm trying to keep power consumption down as well as keep things up during brief power outages. I suppose the switches might be an issue, but the SDRPlay functions fine through them, even at max bandwidth of 1 MHz. Makes no sense.

My newly aquired I5 W10 laptop is hit or miss when using SDRC via wifi. Sometimes, no issues, other times it stutters, but if left alone for a few minutes, it sometimes clears up. Like the other client machines, the SDRPlay's are unaffected.

My network as of today: (see attachment for better quality)


73 Kriss KA1GJU


Re: Airspy HF+ 50MHz Frequency Capability

Mark Cayton <mcayton@...>
 

On Fri, Apr 12, 2019 at 03:02 AM, Jim Smith G0OFE wrote:
I have found the SDR Plays tend to overload rather easily and is next to useless here for Band 2, for that reason. Works fine on other bands including 6m.
The SDRPlay radios may require some pre-filtering under certain circumstances. There are some very effective pre-filters available for little outlay.

Personally I find the SDRPlay receivers to be very capable radios, I've owned 3 different models (still own 2).
 
--
Mark  K1LSB


Re: FM Stereo DXing - Polarisation?

jose maria trueba
 

Leif,

Many times is difficult to put in words ideas, specially when writting in a foreign language. I tend to write the same idea with different sentences in order to avoid confussions but even so miss-interpretations are still possible like this time. 

Let me try again.

Maxwell works are VERY difficult to understand. Their three famous vectors and formulae are well known but concepts are VERY complex.
Receiving with circular polarization any linear polarization transmission at any E plane, normally either vertical or horizontal but  at any other angle too, makes us loose exactly 3dB respect to the signal strength that we receive with the same antenna in linear configuration perfectly aligned to the received E plane.

Isolation of orthogonal polarizations are at most around 20dB in cross dipoles, although many times we see lower numbers and some very good designs can get higher numbers. A perfect antenna would loose an infinite number of dB, in practice decent antennas can only get a 20dB polariation isolation or so. But it always are much higher than 3dB. 

That is why using circular is good because we loose only 3dB, exactly three, and we can forget which angle the linear polarizated wave had been transmittes and at what angle is arriving to our antenna. We can measure the signal strength arriving at our locations simply adding 3dB.

Using a 45° skewed linear polarization antenna to receive vertical or horizontal does not result in a 20dB loss or more, nor 3dB loss, nor 0dB loss, but in unknown number of dB loss. It depends on how imperfect our antennas are. It is not a good idea. Simple, easy, but no good. We do loose exactly 3dB when receiving circular, but we do not loose exactly 3dB when receiving with a 45° skewed linear.

When a radio wave hits a perfect reflector the transmitted polarization suffers a 90° change, as seen in common satellites parabolic reflectors. We set a vertical dipole at the focus to receive horizontal polarizartion and a vertical dipole for horizontal. A ccw circular for cw, and  a cw for ccw, if using circular polarization against a perfect reflector because it acts same as a mirror.

Reflections, refractions in the propagation paths delays produced by multipath and polarization distirtions do appear althoug they are nor a perfect mirror. Circular antennas behave better for multipath problems. Besides  creating multipath, ionizated air layers are not good mirrors but they do affect polarization somehow. 

But when reflections are not that good, angle changes in polarization are random, in practice impossible to predict, although we could move a linear antenna to obtain a minimum signal strength see obtained angle and add 90° to calculate the exact angle.

Similar but different is what we do when aligning skew in a sat dish. But in this case there are no polarization change due to reflections but due to our location respect ro the satellite location after some espheric trigonometric calculations.

Mountains in my area create big problems. Moving an antenna small distance have strong effects. This is why is good to have two or more antennas in phase rather than a bigger single one.
Space diversity is welcome.

I have a pair of 4.5m long LFAs separated 3m side by side, to get some space diversity having two phased beams instead one twice as long of the same total antenna gain. I can null local noise, and even null a repeater when working another one i n the same frequency.They are excellent.

As Michael just wrote...All this is very interesting, no doubt.


Re: Airspy HF+ 50MHz Frequency Capability

Jim Smith G0OFE
 

It's a shame about the customer service attitude, as the Airspy HF+ is an excellent product and is the best SDR rx I have used for Band 2. It is a shame that it does not cover 6m, but probably a result of its design.

I have found the SDR Plays tend to overload rather easily and is next to useless here for Band 2, for that reason. Works fine on other bands including 6m.

================================
Jim, Bournemouth, Dorset. IO90BR.
Elad FDM-S2, Airspy HF+, SDRPlay and Funcube Dongle SDR Recievers
8-element OP-DES for Band 2, 8-element LFA for 2m, 3-element LFA for 6m, 20m Windom for HF,. Wellbrook 1530 Loop for LF


On 12/04/2019 09:30, Brian Howell wrote:
Yes, it seems so.  I never imagined I would be blocked, I just needed an answer to my question to help me decide on what to purchase, if it would do what I wanted it to do.  My B200, as I understand it, has a range of 70MHz-6GHz but I have heard that it can tune below 70MHz but with diminished sensitivity so i thought maybe the HF+ might do that also, I only needed to tune to 50-54MHz, a little below the 60MHz limit.  I might have bought one even if the moderator had at least replied to me off of the message board if he didn't want that question posted.

Yesterday afternoon I ordered an SDRPlay Duo receiver, because it covered the range I needed and because of your reason also.

Thanks,
Brian Howell


From: PaulSent: Friday, April 12, 2019 4:40AM
To: Main
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] Airspy HF+ 50MHz Frequency Capability

 


"It is not unusual for hardware questions to be blocked on the Airspy Groups.IO site. Apparently the monitor does not want to discuss certain hardware issues. I too have had hardware questions blocked."

I spent some time searching various groups on information about both the HF+ and R2, it soon became apparent that the moderator/designer/developer is unable to take any criticism real or perceived of his products so will block anything he deems unworthy. His attitude towards customers shines through in many of his replies and it was for these reasons I went with an SDR Play,

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: SDR-Server v3 stuttering on laptop PCs #sdrconsolev3#airspyhfplus #sdrplay

Paul Abernethy (G8HGG)
 

I also continue to suffer from this problem.  I noted some time ago, that there seems to be a relationship between the problem and the audio hardware on the client.

 

Others have also reported that interposing a virtual cable between the sound “card” and the software, reduces the effect.

 

When I recently updated to version 3.6, the problem seemed to go away.  However, after I briefly used a virtual cable to allow me to decode FT8 transmissions, stuttering was again apparent.  I also noted significant delays in the waterfall’s response to retuning.  I have yet to find time to document this further.

 

I am running old AMD motherboards with WIN10 64 bit on the server and Win 7 64 bit on the client.  I tried reversing the machines, some time ago, with no difference.

 

It has also seemed to be the case that stuttering only starts after I attempt to change the sound channel in use.

 

If you search for previous postings, I have detailed my investigations.

 

 

Regards

Paul

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: paolomassalin@...
Sent: 11 April 2019 09:13
To: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] SDR-Server v3 stuttering on laptop PCs #sdrconsolev3#airspyhfplus #sdrplay

 

I always use wired Gigabit LAN, only wireless devices here are two printers and smartphones (and my brothers laptop).
It seems to be a system bus or resources handling by OS that SDRC/SDRS doesn't like.
As you know I run my SDR server on a N3350 Celeron IPC motherboard, I know it has limited resources but I need it to draw as less power as possible. A long-time friend of mine (we're both hams) has allowed me to use his attic on top of a 12-floor building to place aerials there, excellent reception esp. on VLF. Unfortunately we found out the attic is powered from a common building meter, so everyone pays (a very little and according to their quota) for powering our station. At the moment I'm using a 35W 24V power supply with peak measured power 12W. The attic station is connected to my house with a WLAN bridge maxing out at 80 Mbps, I verified that I run out of bridge bandwidth before running out of computing power on the server system. Local network in the attic is all wired Gigabit of course.
Since I dismantled the aerials in Jan 2019, I brought the server home and use it with a small wideband antenna locally, connected to my local network directly, no bridges in between.
Here's a recap of all the tests I made in Q4 2018, server running Win10 LTSC64 1809:
Lenovo T550 laptop (i7-5600U, Win10 Pro64 1803), wired or wireless: stutters.
Lenovo T470 laptop (i7-7500U, Win10 Pro64 1803), wired or wireless: stutters.
Dell XPS15 9560 (i5-7300H, Win10 Pro64 1803), wired via USB or Thunderbolt and wireless: stutters.
Desktop (i7-7700K, 8GB RAM, integrated graphics, Win10 Pro64 1803), wired on all NICs: works normal.
Desktop (i7-4790S, integrated graphics, Win10 Pro64 1803), wired: works normal.
Desktop (i3-3220, integrated graphics, Win7 Ultimate32), wired: works normal.

Since I'm rebuilding chokes, preparing new cabling and all for the station, I made some slight tweaks to the server while it is at home, and in the meantime refreshed its OS to Win10E64 1809:
Dell XPS15 9560 laptop: stutters.
Desktop (i7-7700K, 32GB RAM, Geforce GTX1080Ti, Win10E64 1809): stutters.
I didn't check on the HTPC or on my brothers systems, but now even my desktop stutters, which never happened last year.

I found out that stuttering behavior changes if I modify ASPM settings in the mobo BIOS on my desktop (i7-7700K):
PCI Express Native Control
PCH PCIE ASPM Control
PCH DMI ASPM Control
NB DMI ASPM Control
Stuttering is reduced (NOT eliminated) setting all these to ENABLED. Disabling PCIE native control stuttering is BAD.
Like I found out last year, trying to produce downstream peripherals traffic (i.e. USB drives, LAN traffic >500 Mbps) reduces the stuttering, last year I was able to totally eliminate it by running SDRC alongside a BD read from a USB optical drive, only to get it back once the disc completed reading.

It likely is a system bus ASPM control that messes with SDRC/SDRS, maybe worsened by installing Win10 1809 on both sides (last year was 1809 server - 1803 clients)

As said, I tried setting up SDRS on the 7700K desktop with the HF+, no dice (and it ain't a smallish Atom!). I will try setting up SDRS on an old i3-2120T/H61 system with Win7.

I always mentioned that connecting SDRC (all 3.0.x versions) to the SpyServer I set up on the system worked fine everywhere and this is still the case.
I'm testing streaming from the SpyServer to SDR#: AirSpyHF+, 660 kHz BW, Float32 data format, Full IQ enabled: network usage is 60-80 Mbps, server CPU utilization 20%, streaming nicely since last night.

To definitely rule out everything networking related, I'll try setting up the server and one client on an isolated network trunk, with a totally unmanaged switch.

I'll have to try setting up an API TCPServer for the RSP2, since SpyServer only works with Airspy or RTLSDR devices.

 


Re: Airspy HF+ 50MHz Frequency Capability

Brian Howell
 

Yes, it seems so.  I never imagined I would be blocked, I just needed an answer to my question to help me decide on what to purchase, if it would do what I wanted it to do.  My B200, as I understand it, has a range of 70MHz-6GHz but I have heard that it can tune below 70MHz but with diminished sensitivity so i thought maybe the HF+ might do that also, I only needed to tune to 50-54MHz, a little below the 60MHz limit.  I might have bought one even if the moderator had at least replied to me off of the message board if he didn't want that question posted.

Yesterday afternoon I ordered an SDRPlay Duo receiver, because it covered the range I needed and because of your reason also.

Thanks,
Brian Howell


From: PaulSent: Friday, April 12, 2019 4:40AM
To: Main
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] Airspy HF+ 50MHz Frequency Capability

 


"It is not unusual for hardware questions to be blocked on the Airspy Groups.IO site. Apparently the monitor does not want to discuss certain hardware issues. I too have had hardware questions blocked."

I spent some time searching various groups on information about both the HF+ and R2, it soon became apparent that the moderator/designer/developer is unable to take any criticism real or perceived of his products so will block anything he deems unworthy. His attitude towards customers shines through in many of his replies and it was for these reasons I went with an SDR Play,


Re: Airspy HF+ 50MHz Frequency Capability

Paul <aceblaggard@...>
 

"It is not unusual for hardware questions to be blocked on the Airspy Groups.IO site. Apparently the monitor does not want to discuss certain hardware issues. I too have had hardware questions blocked."

I spent some time searching various groups on information about both the HF+ and R2, it soon became apparent that the moderator/designer/developer is unable to take any criticism real or perceived of his products so will block anything he deems unworthy. His attitude towards customers shines through in many of his replies and it was for these reasons I went with an SDR Play,


Re: FM Stereo DXing - Polarisation?

Jim Smith G0OFE
 

I would go along with that.

I use an 8 element OP-DES horizontallt polarised, and during Es I have picked up 100w verticals.

During strong relatively short range tropo, I have logged stations in Ireland, Holland and Belgium. No interest in London pirates, they are just a nuisance.

I did consider putting up a vertical beam also, but lack of room, allied to the expected extra return over what are relatively short paths, led me to decide it wasn't really worth it.

================================
Jim, Bournemouth, Dorset. IO90BR.
Elad FDM-S2, Airspy HF+, SDRPlay and Funcube Dongle SDR Recievers
8-element OP-DES for Band 2, 8-element LFA for 2m, 3-element LFA for 6m, 20m Windom for HF,. Wellbrook 1530 Loop for LF


On 12/04/2019 07:35, Paul wrote:
For Es just use a horizontal yagi, even a small one will produce good results if you're in the right place at the right time. A larger model with a sharper pattern and ability to null signals off the side and rear will clear more frequencies for better RDS reception. For tropo unless you're set on DXing Holland, Ireland, London pirates or French locals stick with the same H yagi, if the boom is long enough you could place a five element vertical in front of the stub mast.

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Re: sdr console 3.0.7 loses FCD RX with 9750 offset applied #satellites #sdrconsolev3

Alexandr OK1DST
 

I am afraid I am suffering by the same problem - offset 9750MHz in setup for downconverter but need to tune to 739.xxxMHz to have signals from 10.490MHz band. :-( Using usb RTL-SDR dongle.

73! Lexa, OK1DST


Re: FM Stereo DXing - Polarisation?

Paul <aceblaggard@...>
 

For Es just use a horizontal yagi, even a small one will produce good results if you're in the right place at the right time. A larger model with a sharper pattern and ability to null signals off the side and rear will clear more frequencies for better RDS reception. For tropo unless you're set on DXing Holland, Ireland, London pirates or French locals stick with the same H yagi, if the boom is long enough you could place a five element vertical in front of the stub mast.


Re: sdr console 3.0.7 loses FCD RX with 9750 offset applied #satellites #sdrconsolev3

Mark
 

Hi
 
I have tried both the RTL and fun cube and both work fine here so happy to compare notes if it helps
 
73 <DE> Mark
 

From: gm7eey@...
Sent: Thursday, April 11, 2019 5:45 PM
Subject: Re: [SDR-Radio] sdr console 3.0.7 loses FCD RX with 9750 offset applied #satellites #sdrconsolev3
 

1- This is 2m FCD working fine.


2- This is FCD on 739MHz receiving from LNB, no offset entered


3- This is FCD on 739MHz with offset, receiving from LNB


4- This is FCD now moved to 10GHz for "real" frequency work, RX now dead.


5- Stop FCD, turn off the offset, now FCD started, back to 739MHz already proved working, now dead RX.

Attachments:


Re: FM Stereo DXing - Polarisation?

Michael.2E0IHW
 

An interesting thread!

Related to the polarisation issue, but slightly OT:

Some years ago, with the re-shuffle of DTT muxes,
a powerful transmitter across the water was allocated
the same frequencies as our local TV relay,
but with opposite polarisation.

With tidal rise and fall, the signal was subject to
addition and subtraction of the direct
and the water-reflected signal, but also
- here significantly - to "tidal twist"
of the signal's polarisation.

Many locals received both signals on the same
channels and, consequently, very erratic reception.

QED : polar twist can happen.

Michael



Re: FM Stereo DXing - Polarisation?

Leif Asbrink
 

Hi Simon,

You could mount your antenna at 45 degrees to always
loose 3 dB. A circularly polarized antenna is a bad
idea since you would use two crossed yagis for
that. By use of two feed cables (or a relay)
you would gain 3 dB compared to circular by selecting
the correct antenna.

73

Leif

Assuming tropo & E's on 88-108MHz I really need a pair of crossed antennas ?



Simon Brown, G4ELI

www.sdr-radio.com



-----Original Message-----
From: main@SDR-Radio.groups.io <main@SDR-Radio.groups.io> On Behalf Of Leif
Asbrink



The statement "Mounting a linear polarizated antenna at 45° does not loose
3dB when receiving vertical or horizontal, but a completly unknown number
of dBs." is simply false.

It is valid only if the 45° antenna is a directional antenna pointing in the
wrong direction. Polarization is well conserved when a RX antenna is pointed
towards the geographical location of the transmitter.



The above is based on solid experience on 144 MHz, but it seems to me that
88-108 MHz would not be different.




Re: FM Stereo DXing - Polarisation?

Leif Asbrink
 

Jose,

You wrote:
"Mounting a linear polarizated antenna at 45° does not
loose 3dB when receiving vertical or horizontal, but
a completly unknown number of dBs. You loose exactly 3dB
when you use a circular antenna to receive a linear
polarizated transmission, or the other way around
receiving with a linear antenna a circular polarizated
transmission."

Your statement is incomplete. I can rephrase it in such
a way that it expresses what I assume you wanted to say:

"Mounting a linear polarizated antenna at 45° looses exactly
3dB when receiving an incoming wave with vertical or horizontal
polarization you also loose exactly 3dB when you use a
circular antenna to receive a linear polarizated incoming
wave, or the other way around receiving with a linear antenna
aincoming circular polarizated wave. Now, if we talk about
the transmitted polarization in relation to received
polarization it is different. Mounting a linear polarizated
antenna at 45° will loose a completly unknown number of dBs.
(From 0 to some large number.) regardless of the polarization
of the transmitting antenna.
It is exactly the same for a horizontal or a vertical antenna.
You also loose a completly unknown number of dBs if you
use a circular antenna regardless of whether the transmit
antenna is circular or linear or opposite circular."

The above statement is correct but misleading while your
original statement is incorrect.

The problem is reflections at an angle. I gave specific
details in my posting.

For a DXer who has a yagi with a substantial antenna
gain and who points it in the true direction to the
transmitter the following is true nearly always:
"Mounting a linear polarizated antenna at 45° looses
3dB when receiving vertical or horizontal. You also
loose 3dB when you use a circular antenna to receive
a linear polarizated transmission, or the other way around
receiving with a linear antenna a circular polarizated
transmission."

The statement becomes true because polarization is conserved
in all propagation forms on VHF where "the reflection point"
is on a straight line between transmitter and receiver.

You say "Demonstration is required." I no longer have an
antenna to demonstrate to you, but your statement "your
afirmation simply as an absurb ofence from an uneducated
and rud member of the group." That statement hits back
on you - feel ashamed.

Maxwells equations have been known for quite some time
by now. What I have written is in full accordance with
what we can compute. Maybe someone on this list who has
a dual polarization yagi array could make an IQ recording
available where a station at some 100 km distance is received
as circular while the transmitted wave is horizontal.
This happens frequently if both stations point to a common
direction while none is pointing to the other station.
It is un-interesting for the subject of this thread however.
"FM Stereo DXing - Polarisation?" What is the best?

The answer is it depends. Best to have a cross yagi
to have all polarizations available.

Leif


Re: not seeing waterfall and beacon in beacon pane

Italo Crivellotto
 


Confermo ; devi aggiustare l'offset del LNB; il mio l'ho messo 975.400 MHz
73 


Re: sdr console 3.0.7 loses FCD RX with 9750 offset applied #satellites #sdrconsolev3

gm7eey@...
 

Another try, attached this time :)